Notice and Note Questions for in-class work on Friday 5/9. This is not homework.

Uncovering the Cover, Words of the Wiser, and Again and Again (50 pts)

TO REINFORCE THE IMPORTANT IDEAS WE DISCUSSED IN CLASS THIS WEEK, PLEASE DISCUSS AND RESPOND TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS IN SMALL GROUPS. YOUR GROUP WILL BE ASSIGNED.

Please answer these questions in small groups.

FIRST, discuss. As you discuss the questions, each student should take or add to his/her own notes in their books.

SECOND, write. Then, as a group, write up a formal response to each of the three questions on loose leaf. Everyone writes their own responses on their own loose leaf. Ensure everyone’s names are on your work.

Your work should reflect what you should be proud to show a ninth grade English teacher. If your work is not the kind of quality you’d show a ninth grade teacher, then do not bother to turn it in — I don’t want to waste my time or the ninth grade teachers’ time reading it.

No computers at all. No typing. No Google. No GoogleDocs.

 

1. “It’s a sin to kill a mockingbird…”

Page 103 – Ta da! The title of the novel shows up.

Based upon what Atticus and Miss Maudie tell Jem and Scout about mockingbirds, why is it a sin to kill a mockingbird? What do you think this means in the larger context of the novel? 

2. Miss Maudie – Quite a “Wiser”

Page 112 – The idea of “unfair advantage.”

With his talent in marksmanship, Miss Maudie tells Scout that Atticus “realized that God had given him an unfair advantage over most living things.” What do you think “unfair advantage” means? Who else has an “unfair advantage” in this novel?

 3. Atticus – the Wisest of All Wisers

Page 128 – The real definition of “courage.”

Atticus tells Jem and Scout that he asked them to read to Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose so that they could witness the real definition of “courage.” Hmmm…his definition sounds familiar…”you know you’re licked before you begin but you begin anyway…” Where have we heard that before? What does Atticus want the kids to understand about “courage”?

4. Clean-livin’ folks 

Look back at everything you’ve read so far about:

  • The Cunninghams (pages 21-27)
  • The Ewells (pages 29-30, 33-34)
  • The Robinsons (pages 86, 100-101)

Compare and contrast these three families. How is each described or portrayed — in terms of money, cleanliness, education, pride, respectability, morality, and power. Who has unfair advantages and why? Who has unfair disadvantages and why? If you had to create a caste system or a social ladder for Maycomb, where would you put these three families? Where would you put the Finches? Why?

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s