Make sure your monologue has…

1. Scenario — Set up the context for the monologue. Do all your introducing here.

2. Setting — When the curtain goes up, what will the audience see? Remember, setting is not just location but also atmosphere and mood.

3. An interesting, attention-grabbing first line.

4. A memorable, thought-provoking final line.

5. A range of emotion.

6. Realistic body language and movements.

7. Voice and Word Choice. Every line, ask yourselves, is this what my character would say? Would my character use this word? Would my character express him/herself in this way?

Monologue First Draft Peer Review – in class on Friday 5/30.

CHOOSE A PARTNER FOR PEER REVIEW AND SHARE YOUR CHARACTER SKETCHES AND YOUR ROUGH DRAFTS OF YOUR MONOLOGUES IN GOOGLEDOCS.

FIRST, READ THROUGH THE CHARACTER SKETCH AND THE SCENARIO ESTABLISHING THE CONTEXT AND THE SETTING OF THE MONOLOGUE ONLY. DO NOT READ THE REST OF THE MONOLOGUE YET!

1. Read through your partner’s character sketch for their monologue. Based on this character sketch, what three words would you use to describe the character?

2. Read the scenario that explains what is happening when the monologue takes place and the setting that describes what the audience will see when the character is speaking. Based on this background information that the writer has provided, what do you expect the setting to be like? Describe it in your own words. What do you imagine in your mind when you read these things?

3. Tell your partner what you said for #1 and #2. Is your perception as an audience member the one that the writer wanted you to have? If it’s not – if your ideas are way off from what the writer was thinking – they will need to revise accordingly.

4. Knowing the context and setting of the monologue, what emotions do you expect to see portrayed by the character? What gestures, expressions, tone of voice, movements, and so on do you expect to see?

5. What point do you expect the character to make? How do you think the monologue will end?

6. Tell your partner what you said for #4 and #5.

 

NOW, READ THE MONOLOGUE.

7. What are the purpose and the point of the monologue? Summarize its purpose and point in one to two complete sentences. If you can’t summarize them in a few sentences, then maybe they’re not clear and the writer needs to work on them.

8. Tell your partner what you said for #7. Ask your partner to explain in their own words what they think the purpose and the point are.

 

NOW THAT YOU KNOW WHO THE CHARACTER IS, WHAT THE CHARACTER IS LIKE, WHAT THE CONTEXT AND SETTING ARE, AND WHAT THE PURPOSE AND POINT ARE, REREAD THE MONOLOGUE A SECOND TIME.

9. Find five rich, effective, strong lines. Underline them and compliment your partner on them

10. Find five dull or flat lines and offer stronger, more powerful alternatives. Bold the original and then type the replacement next to it. Bold your replacement, too

11. Identify any parts of the monologue that need more detail or more description, that are confusing, or that don’t seem to work in your opinion. Bold these. Explain to your partner what you think isn’t working in these parts.

12. Identify any parts of the monologue that need clearer stage direction. Can you clearly imagine what the character is doing, what they look like, what expression is on their face, and so on? Bold any places where you think more specific, detailed stage direction is needed. Explain to your partner what you think is needed in these parts.

 

WHEN YOU HAVE COMPLETED THE PEER REVIEW, PLEASE BEGIN REVISING YOUR MONOLOGUE.

A COMPLETE, REVISED, NEAR POLISHED SECOND ROUGH DRAFT IS DUE ON MONDAY 6/2.

PLEASE USE YOUR TIME WISELY. REMEMBER, THIS IS YOUR FINAL PROJECT.

 

 

 

 

Character Sketch Activity – in class on Wed 5/28 – (50 pts)

Now that you have decided whose skin you’re going to walk around in for your monologue project, please complete the character sketch below.

Use GoogleDocs. Label it: your section, Character Sketch of character name, by Your Name

example: 8-1 Character Sketch of Mayella Ewell by Lily Robinson

Submit your assignment in your NEW English folder (the same one in which you submitted your Tom Robinson/Tim Johnson paper).

You may write in bullet points. You do not need to write in complete sentences.

Character Sketch:

1. Who is your character?

2. What do you know about your character (from the novel)? If it is a major character about whom you know a lot, then summarize the key points. Think age, gender, race, class, occupation—the basic facts.

3. With whom in the book does your character have a relationship? What is the relationship? If you have a major character who has relationships with the majority of the characters in the book, then list only the important relationships.

4. How do others (particularly Scout) feel about your character?

5. What are at least three traits very specific to your character? Why do you think your character has developed these very particular traits?

6. What is one of your character’s prejudices, meaning what is a bias your character holds against others? Explain that character’s prejudice.

7. Are there any prejudices or biases your character faces, meaning are they the victim of prejudice or bias? Explain the prejudices your character faces.

8. What is your character’s greatest strength and greatest weakness? Explain.

 

This activity adapted from one at http://mrfidlerswebsite.net.

 

Final Project: The Mockingbird Monologues (500 points)

Atticus tells Scout that if she can “learn a simple trick,” she will “get along a lot better with all kinds of folks” (33). Atticus says, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…until you climb into his skin and walk around in it” (33). That’s exactly what you are going to do for your final project.

As your final project, you will write and perform a monologue based on a character from Harper Lee’sTo Kill a Mockingbird.

You will embody a character, taking on his/her traits, beliefs, attitudes, fears, and feelings as your own.

Choose one of the following options:

a) Write a monologue from a moment that doesn’t actually occur in the book (before the book starts, one that isn’t fully described in the book, or an epilogue that takes place after the book ends).

OR

b) The novel is told from Scout’s perspective. Choose one other character in the novel and write a monologue of his/her inner thoughts during a key moment in the plot.

 

Written Script Requirements:

The monologue must be 3-5 minutes in length (when it is performed).

Write in proper script format (use A Midsummer Night’s Dream for formatting). Use this link to the template on GoogleDocs.

Write a brief scenario (1-2 paragraphs) describing the situation or what has occurred before the start of your monologue. This comes before your description of your setting in your script. This is written only; you will not perform this introduction.

Include stage directions (describe movement, name the emotion the character is experiencing as they speak or describe the way that the character is speaking).

Your monologue must reflect your character’s life story, as told in the novel and as supplemented by you, including but not limited to the following: manner of speaking, vocabulary, voice, attitude, appearance, clothing, age, career or other community role, socioeconomic background, etc. While you may add new information to create a rounder character, you may not contradict anything in the novel.

Your monologue must be historically accurate and should reflect the historical, cultural, and social context of the time period.

Your monologue will be almost like a missing scene from the novel; we’ll see but the only person speaking will be your character. The goal is to show the audience what your character was really thinking inside when certain events from the novel happened.

You get to choose what your character says and the underlying circumstances for the monologue (when, where, and why your character says what s/he does). You even get to make up a backstory that sheds new light on your character—just so long as the new facts you add do not contradict the facts presented in the novel.

A template for writing your monologue can be found on Google Drive. Click here.

 

Performance Requirements:

The monologue must be memorized if performed live or must appear to be memorized if recorded.

The monologue must be well-rehearsed and polished.

The performance must include costumes and props appropriate to the characters and the monologue.

The performance must be in character. Use voice and movement that reflects the character.

The video and audio quality of the recording must be high; there can be no background noise, shaky cameras, and so on.

Any editing of the video must be done as seamlessly as possible. The video should look professional, not like something you hastily created at the last minute.

If you are not proficient in recording or editing movies, please ask for help from someone who is.

 

Characteristics of Powerful Monologues:

  • Have and make a clear point.
  • Reveal the character’s inner thoughts, feelings, tensions, anxieties, and desires.
  • Portray powerful and personal emotions.
  • May show change in the character – whether a change in heart or attitude.
  • Use a variety of tones.
    • A monologue that starts in one place and ends up somewhere entirely different will make the tension more dramatic, the characters more compelling, and your script much better.
    • A good monologue should be alternatively funny, harrowing, and touching, pointing on no one emotion or no one state by itself.
  • Have a clear beginning, middle, and end.
    • Even if the character is not changed significantly, perhaps their decision to speak up is a change in and of itself. A taciturn character driven to a long monologue is revealing, when deployed properly. Why have they spoken up now? How does this change the way we feel about them?
    • Consider allowing the character to change as they speak over the course of their monologue. If a character starts in a rage, it might be more interesting for their to end in hysterics, or laughter. If they start out laughing, maybe they end up contemplative. Use the monologue as a vessel for change.
    • If it’s a story, it needs to have an arc. If it’s a rant, it needs to change into something else. If it’s a plea, it needs to up the ante over the course of its pleading.
    • The beginning of a good monologue will hook the audience and the other characters. The beginning should signal that something important is happening.
    • In the middle, the monologue should climax. Build it to its maximum height and then bring it back down to lower the tension and allow the conversation between the characters to continue or end entirely. This is where the specific details, the drama, and the tangents in the monologue will occur.
    • The ending should bring the speech or the story back around to the play at hand. The tension of the monologue is relieved and the scene ends on that note of finality.

 

Reflection:

After writing and performing your monologue, you will write a two- to three-page reflection on what you have learned not only in studying To Kill a Mockingbird and completing this Mockingbird Monologues project, but all what you have learned throughout the entire year in 8th grade English. Full detailed questions to be answered in your reflection will be provided.

 

Rubric:

Mockingbird Monologue Rubric PDF

 

DUE DATES:

1ST ROUGH DRAFT OF MONOLOGUE DUE: FRIDAY, MAY 30TH.

2ND ROUGH DRAFT OF MONOLOGUE (REVISED FROM 1ST ROUGH DRAFT) DUE: MONDAY, JUNE 2ND.

IN-CLASS PERFORMANCES FOR THOSE WHO CHOOSE TO PERFORM: FRIDAY, JUNE 6TH.

FINAL DRAFT OF ENTIRE PROJECT, INCLUDING SCRIPT, VIDEO, AND REFLECTION DUE: MONDAY, JUNE 9TH.

IF YOU COMPLETE THE PROJECT EARLY AND WOULD LIKE TO PERFORM OR SHOW YOUR VIDEO TO THE CLASS BEFORE FRIDAY, JUNE 6TH, YOU ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE EXTRA CREDIT. EXTRA CREDIT WILL BE AWARDED BASED UPON THE QUALITY OF THE PROJECT. FINISHING EARLY DOES NOT GUARANTEE EXTRA CREDIT.

 

HELP:

The Horton Foote script of the film version of TKAM

Template for monologue script formatting

Pre-Writing Help: Mockingbird Monologue Pre-Writing Worksheets — These are Word docs that you can upload into GoogleDocs.

 

Dr. Walczak adapted ideas found in these sources:

wikihow.com/Make-a-Monologue

msgallin9300.wordpress.com

mathman.dreamhosters.com

mrfidlerswebsite.net

 

TRTJ Paragraph(s) FINAL DRAFT DUE FRIDAY 5/23.

IN YOUR FINAL DRAFT, COLOR CODE THE PARTS OF YOUR PAPER AS FOLLOWS:

GREEN = THESIS

RED = INTRODUCTION TO QUOTES

BLUE = EXPLANATION OF QUOTES

BOLD BLACK = QUOTATION MARKS, PARENTHESES, PAGE NUMBER, PERIOD AT THE VERY END FOR ALL QUOTES.

ITALICIZE THE BOOK TITLE

Make sure you begin your paragraph with context about the book.

Make sure there are no grammar or mechanics errors.

 

 


 

FOR ROUGH DRAFTS:

1. Underline your thesis statement.

2. Bold where you introduce each piece of evidence. DO NOT introduce quotes by saying what page they’re on. Introduce quotes by providing context for them.

3. Italicize where you explain how each piece of evidence supports your thesis statement. Show where you connect the evidence to your thesis.

4. Underline your conclusions. Show where you tie your conclusions back to your thesis.

5. Check for grammar and mechanical errors. NOTE: I will stop reading at the first grammar/mechanics error I see.

 

AFTER YOU IDENTIFY THESE THINGS ON YOUR OWN DRAFT, TRADE WITH A PARTNER.

LOOK AT EVERYTHING THEY’VE IDENTIFIED ON THEIR DRAFT. SUGGEST REVISIONS AS NEEDED.

Consider…

1. Does your partner have a thesis statement?

2. Do they introduce each piece of evidence? If they introduce quotes by saying what page they’re on, suggest a change that provides context for the quote.

3. Do they explain how each piece of evidence supports their thesis statement. If not, help them connect the evidence to their thesis.

4. Do they draw conclusions? If not, help them tie their conclusions back to their thesis.

5. Check for grammar and mechanical errors. NOTE: I will stop reading at the first grammar/mechanics error I see.

 

Tom Robinson and Tim Johnson (100 pts)

Tom Robinson and Tim Johnson Analysis

Name your GoogleDoc: 8-# TRTJ Analysis your first name and last initial

(example: 8-1 TRTJ Analysis Lily R. and Natalie L.)

Rough Draft Due: Wednesday 5/21.

Final Draft Due: Friday 5/23.

On pages 239-41, Scout hears the verdict in Tom Robison’s trial.

Scout likens the atmosphere in the courtroom to the time “when the mockingbirds were still and the carpenters had stopped hammering on Miss Maudie’s new house, and every wood door in the neighborhood was shut as tight as the doors of the Radley Place. A deserted, waiting, empty street, and the courtroom packed with people” (240). She expects to hear Mr. Tate say, “‘Take him, Mr. Finch’” (240).

And when the jury files in, she immediately realizes that none of the jurors look at Tom Robinson, meaning she knows they have convicted him. She thinks, “…and it was like watching Atticus walk into the street, raise a rifle to his shoulder and pull the trigger, but watching all the time knowing that the gun was empty” (240).

Why in this scene when Tom Robinson is found guilty does Scout harken back to the scene in which Atticus shoots the rabid dog in the street? What connects these two scenes? Think symbolically and metaphorically, not literally.

To answer this question, you will write one to two paragraphs:

  • Start with an intriguing, thought-provoking, clear, and concise THESIS STATEMENT that establishes the point you want to make about how these two scenes connect. In your thesis statement, very explicitly state how these two scenes connect.
  • Then, prove your thesis is correct. Give at least THREE reasons why your thesis statement is right. Support each of your reasons with evidence from the novel. Each of your three reasons should include:
    • Introduction to the passage you will cite as evidence.
    • The passage itself.
    • Explanation of how this passage supports or proves your thesis statement.
  • Draw a conclusion and demonstrate how these three reasons prove your point about how these two scenes connect.
  • Throughout, provide context for your audience. Pretend that your audience has not read the novel in a long time so you have to set up the scene for them, very briefly explaining what is happening in that scene. Always provide the background information your audience needs in order to understand what you’re stating in your paragraph.
  • Keep the need for focus and brevity in mind.
  • A paragraph should be about nine to twelve sentences long.

There are not necessarily three right or wrong reasons; however, your three reasons should demonstrate that you are critically thinking about the novel, that you are thinking symbolically and metaphorically, and that you can support your ideas with specific textual evidence.

Important Pages:

The “One-Shot Finch” scene in which Atticus shoots the rabid dog and Miss Maudie remarks on Atticus’s “unfair advantage” is on pages 108-113.

Atticus’s explanation of “courage” (“…instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand…”) is on page 128.

A townsperson’s comment that Atticus “aims” to defend Tom Robinson is on page 186.

Atticus’s closing remarks are on pages 230-234.

TKAM Discussion Questions for Chapters 16-19 (for class on Wed 5/14 — this is not homework).

Please work in your small group to discuss and annotate your responses to the following questions. You may write directly in your book or take separate notes, but everyone must record the responses for themselves.

1. What do we learn about the Ewells’ yard on page 194 (about half-way down the page)?  What is significant about this aspect of their yard that “bewildered Maycomb”?  How does this aspect of their yard relate to Mayella Ewell?  (Look at page 203 and 218, too.)

2. Scout thinks Mayella must be “the loneliest person in the world” (218). Why does she think this? What do you think? Do you agree or disagree and why?

3. What mistake does Tom Robinson make in his testimony on page 224? How is this a mistake?

4. Why does Dill cry? (See page 225-26.) What does this tell us about Dill? Think about what we’ve learned about Dill thus far in the novel — remember the turtle thing?

 

Notice and Note Questions for in-class work on Friday 5/9. This is not homework.

Uncovering the Cover, Words of the Wiser, and Again and Again (50 pts)

TO REINFORCE THE IMPORTANT IDEAS WE DISCUSSED IN CLASS THIS WEEK, PLEASE DISCUSS AND RESPOND TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS IN SMALL GROUPS. YOUR GROUP WILL BE ASSIGNED.

Please answer these questions in small groups.

FIRST, discuss. As you discuss the questions, each student should take or add to his/her own notes in their books.

SECOND, write. Then, as a group, write up a formal response to each of the three questions on loose leaf. Everyone writes their own responses on their own loose leaf. Ensure everyone’s names are on your work.

Your work should reflect what you should be proud to show a ninth grade English teacher. If your work is not the kind of quality you’d show a ninth grade teacher, then do not bother to turn it in — I don’t want to waste my time or the ninth grade teachers’ time reading it.

No computers at all. No typing. No Google. No GoogleDocs.

 

1. “It’s a sin to kill a mockingbird…”

Page 103 – Ta da! The title of the novel shows up.

Based upon what Atticus and Miss Maudie tell Jem and Scout about mockingbirds, why is it a sin to kill a mockingbird? What do you think this means in the larger context of the novel? 

2. Miss Maudie – Quite a “Wiser”

Page 112 – The idea of “unfair advantage.”

With his talent in marksmanship, Miss Maudie tells Scout that Atticus “realized that God had given him an unfair advantage over most living things.” What do you think “unfair advantage” means? Who else has an “unfair advantage” in this novel?

 3. Atticus – the Wisest of All Wisers

Page 128 – The real definition of “courage.”

Atticus tells Jem and Scout that he asked them to read to Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose so that they could witness the real definition of “courage.” Hmmm…his definition sounds familiar…”you know you’re licked before you begin but you begin anyway…” Where have we heard that before? What does Atticus want the kids to understand about “courage”?

4. Clean-livin’ folks 

Look back at everything you’ve read so far about:

  • The Cunninghams (pages 21-27)
  • The Ewells (pages 29-30, 33-34)
  • The Robinsons (pages 86, 100-101)

Compare and contrast these three families. How is each described or portrayed — in terms of money, cleanliness, education, pride, respectability, morality, and power. Who has unfair advantages and why? Who has unfair disadvantages and why? If you had to create a caste system or a social ladder for Maycomb, where would you put these three families? Where would you put the Finches? Why?

 

The Radley Live Oak Tree… (work on in class on Tues 5/6).

This is not homework! We are working on this in class on Tuesday 5/6.

Radley Live Oak Tree Poster
(50 points)

Make a creative interpretive poster of the items Scout and Jem find in the knothole of the live oak tree on the Radley lot. Use both artistic representations and text explanations, meaning, draw what you would like to draw, but also include hand-written labels, information, explanations, and so on.

1. Show everything that Scout and Jem find in the knothole of the oak tree.

2. Explain how you know each of the items are FOR Scout and Jem and are FROM Boo Radley.

3. Identify the symbolic significance of each item. What do you think each item represents? Why? Think beyond the obvious; challenge yourself. What might these items symbolize?

4. Explain what you think might be the purpose or the message behind the items in the knothole. What, if anything, is Boo trying to do or to communicate with these gifts for Scout and Jem?

Refer to pages: 37-40, 66-71.

TKAM Chapters 1-2 Discussion Questions for class on Thursday 5/1/14 (40 points) – This is not homework due Thursday, but stuff we’ll do in class on Thursday.

Please answer the following questions on GoogleDocs. Work collaboratively; please no divide and conquer.

In your English folders, create a document called 8-# TKAM Chs 1-2 Names. (example: 8-1 TKAM Chs 1-2 Lily R and Eden E) Share it with me. If your document is not properly titled so that I can identify it easily in my Drive, I will not assess it.

Please, please, please — go beyond the obvious. I’m not interested in the surface-level stuff. Dig deeper. Show me your Upper School level critical reading, thinking, and writing skills; show off your literary analysis skills.

  1. Scout thinks, “Nobody knew what form of intimidation Mr. Radley employed to keep Boo out of sight, but Jem figured that Mr. Radley kept him chained to the bed most of the time. Atticus said no, it wasn’t that sort of thing, that there were other ways of making people into ghosts” (12). What do you think Atticus means? Obviously, Boo Radley is not dead so not literally a ghost – but how has he been made – how has he become – a ghost, metaphorically or symbolically?
  1. Jem and Dill talk about how to get a turtle to come out of its shell. Jem and Dill have very different opinions and perspectives (15). Look at what the boys say. What does this exchange tell us about Dill? What kind of boy is Dill?
  1. How does the morning of Scout’s first day of school go?  What is Miss Caroline like?  Does she “fit in” to Maycomb so far?  Why or why not?  What does Miss Caroline’s ability to fit in or not fit in tell us about Maycomb’s culture? Look at pages 17-24.
  1. Just from what Scout has thought and said about Walter Cunningham and his family in the first two chapters, what do you think about the Cunningham family so far? How would you characterize them so far? Why does Scout think that when she says to Miss Caroline, “Miss Caroline, he’s a Cunningham” (22), that that one statement would be a sufficient enough explanation as to why Walter won’t take Miss Caroline’s quarter? Look at pages 21 through 24.

Everything you need for Tuesday 4/15.

Watch video of Act III Scene 1.

(If the video doesn’t work, use the DVD on my desk. Watch chapters 10-15. The laptop will need to be connected directly to the SmartBoard, not through AppleTV, to watch the DVD.)

Write your scripts for Act III Scene 2.

Study for a vocabulary quiz on “cunning” through “compel” on WEDNESDAY 4/16.

 

ENGLISH 8-4 AND 8-5:

YOU HAVE TO PERFORM YOUR ACT II SCENE 2 SCRIPTS! PLEASE BE SURE THAT ALL OF THE PERFORMANCES AND RECORDED AND GIVEN TO ME. YOU CAN UPLOAD TO YOUTUBE DIRECTLY. MR. G. HAS THE USERNAME AND PASSWORD.

 

Act III Scene 2 Scripts and Performances

Yes… it’s time… This is the scene where Demetrius and Lysander try to beat each other up and Helena and Hermia go at each other full of fury. This is the big fight scene. And it’s what you’re going to script out and perform next.

You will WRITE your scripts in your guilds, but you will not necessarily perform your script with your members! That means everyone’s scripts need to be thorough and understandable because someone else might get it handed to them to perform.

Here’s what happens in this scene:

  • Puck tells Oberon that he managed to get Titania to fall in love with a donkey! They’re both thrilled.
  • They see Demetrius and Hermia. Hermia is accusing Demetrius of doing something to Lysander. Demetrius, angry, says he did not do anything to Lysander.
  • Hermia storms off, and Demetrius decides to rest.
  • Oberon, furious at Puck, tells Puck to fix the mess he’s made.
  • Oberon annoints Demetrius’s eyes while Puck goes off to find Helena and lead Helena to Demetrius.
  • Helena, followed by Lysander, enter — they wake up Demetrius — Demetrius wakes up… aaaaaaaand…
  • Demetrius falls madly in love with Helena.
  • Helena accuses both boys of mocking her and teasing her.
  • Both boys completely denounce (abjure!) their love for Hermia… aaaaaaaand…
  • Hermia enters. Lysander rejects Hermia and Hermia freaks out.
  • Helena thinks Hermia is part of the big joke, too — she thinks Hermia is teasing her, too.
  • Hermia thinks Helena has stolen Lysander away from her.
  • The boys go after one another, determined to prove which one loves Helena more.
  • The girls go after one another, fighting over the boys. Helena teases Hermia’s short stature, and Hermia teases Helena’s height.
  • Puck thinks all this mayhem is AWESOME, but Oberon tells him he’s made a mess of everything and needs to fix it by getting everyone rounded up and back to sleep.
  • Puck leads the lovers around the forest by imitating the lovers’ voices so that they’ll follow him. Eventually, he gets them all in the same place.
  • The lovers fall asleep, and now — you and your guild need to figure out what happens from lines 448-464 (page 56).

That’s a lot to cover! But it’s a lot of fun stuff to cover. And here’s where I’m gonna make it a little harder on ya —

Everything is in rhyme. The majority of it — meaning I’ll let ya slide here and there — should be in rhyming couplets. Check out how Shakespeare did it. For the mot part, it’s in rhyme, so for the most part, yours should be, too.

Have FUN with this one. But keep it clean!

Act II Scene 2 lines 41-162

For your next performance, you will portray Act II Scene 2 lines 41-162. You’ll need a Demetrius, Helena, Lysander, Hermia, and Puck.

In your scene, please pay especially close attention to your stage directions! Where actors stand/sit/lay down and how they both physically and verbally interact with one another is very important in this scene.

As always, be sure you hit the most important parts of the scene, including:

  • Lysander and Hermia’s arrangements to spend the night in the forest.
  • Puck anointing Lysander’s eyes.
  • Demetrius and Helena coming through and fight.
  • Helena finding Lysander and waking him up.
  • Lysander falling in love with Helena, Helena accusing him of teasing her, Helena running off, and Lysander following.

Any lines Puck says must rhyme! Puck must talk in rhyming couplets.
aa, bb, cc, dd, ee, ff, gg, hh, ii, jj, kk…

If you’re up for it, write the entire script in rhyming couplets.

Remember, I want to know what your guild thinks, not what Google thinks.

Act II Scene 1 Lines 1-187

Write a script for Act II Scene 1 lines 1-187, hitting the most important parts of the scene, including:

  • The fairy and Puck meet and talk about Puck’s reputation.
  • Puck begins to explain why Oberon and Titania are fighting.
  • Oberon and Titania meet and accuse one another of being unfaithful.
  • Titania explains what is happening in the mortal world because of the discord in the fairy world.
  • Oberon tells Titania what she has to do to stop the fighting, and Titania responds.
  • After Titania storms off, Oberon comes up with a plan.
  • Oberon and Puck discuss the plan and begin to put it into action.

You may write in modern English with one little twist… write in rhyming couplets.

aa, bb, cc, dd, ee, ff, gg, hh, ii, jj, kk…

If you’re up for it, write the entire script in rhyming couplets. If you’re not up for the challenge, choose at least one of the sections below to write in rhyme:

  • Fairy and Puck meeting and talking.
  • Titania explaining what’s wrong in the mortal world.
  • Oberon and Puck discussing Oberon’s plan for getting back at Titania.

For now, I won’t hold it against you if it’s not in iambic pentameter, as long as it rhymes. :)

Remember, I want to know what your guild thinks, not what Google thinks.

 

Act II Scene 1 Lines 1-187.

Read the first part of Act II Scene 1 with your guild. In your guild, annotate your own books with the answers to the following questions. You may also choose to handwrite your answers on loose-leaf. However, you may not use your laptops or type. (I want to know what YOU think, not what you find when you Google this stuff.)

Don’t get frustrated. Do your best. And don’t forget to use the notes in the column on the left of the page!

Questions:

1. Look at what the fairy says to Puck in lines 32-42. What pranks does Puck pull?

2. When Puck responds in lines 43-58, what three additional pranks does Puck tell the fairy about?

3. When Oberon and Titania meet, what do they accuse one another of? (See lines 60-80).

4. Because Oberon and Titania are fighting and the fairy world is in disarray, what is happening in the human world? (See lines 81-117).

5. What are Oberon and Titania fighting about? (See lines 118-137 and lines 18-31)).

6. What is Oberon’s plan for getting back at Titania? What do he and Puck plan to do? (See lines 155-187).

 

Act I Scene 1 Lines 128-251.

Key moments in the last part of Act I Scene 1:

  • Lysander and Hermia talk about love and devise a plan.
  • Helena enters and laments that Demetrius loves Hermia, not her.
  • Hermia tells Helena their plan.
  • Helena decides to do something with this information about the plan.

Compose a script and perform this scene!

Need: Lysander, Hermia, Helena

Write your own script, hitting the most important moments in this scene. You do not need to go line by line; just be sure to hit the important stuff.

You may write in modern English.

Preparation for and Reflection on English for Student-Parent-Teacher Conferences.

Paragraph on Frost’s “Stopping by Woods…” and Bly’s “Driving to Town…”

Now that you have completed your paragraph (alone or with your writing partner), you will exchange work with a peer review partner and help each other identify four important parts of your responses.

  • Introduction of the poems (poem titles, poets’ names) = italics.
  • Specific thesis (exactly what they will prove in their paragraph) = bold.
  • At least four examples (evidence, meaning quotes from the poems) = underline each.
  • Conclusion (wraps up the paragraph) = italics.

If you cannot find these things, they may be missing. Let the writer know.

Then, read your peer review partner’s work for its fluency, sentence variety, word choice, grammar, mechanics, and so on. Help one another put together the best paragraph you possibly can.

When you have read one another’s work, discuss your paragraphs together. Ensure your paragraph is complete and successfully meets the expectations and requirements of the writing assignment.

 

Reflection on English Class

Let’s take a few minutes to reflect on where we are and where we’re going in English. On loose-leaf, please address the following questions in a paragraph format in complete sentences.

Please write neatly and legibly.

Again, please write in paragraph format in complete sentences.

What are the skills, habits, and knowledge you need to be successful in critically reading, thinking, and writing — not just in English class but in assignments in all of your classes?

What are the three skills or habits you feel most confident and most comfortable in?

What skills, habits, or knowledge are you still struggling with?

How would you describe and evaluate your attitude, behavior, participation, and engagement in class activities and discussions?

Set at least two goals for yourself for the remainder of the school year. What do you hope to accomplish in the last few months of English?

For Monday 3/3/14.

Hi, 8th graders. I won’t be at school on Monday. Please work with Mr. Gonring on the following…

Frost-Bly Stopping-Driving Paragraph

One to two paragraphs comparing and contrasting Frost and Bly poems. The instructions are on the handout.

You may choose to work alone or with one partner. There cannot be a group of three.

Remember, this assignment is giving me a snapshot of your skills so that I can evaluate and discuss your skills at Student-Parent-Teacher Conferences. Thus, you are very highly encouraged to put forth your very best effort, quality, and focus.

This is NOT due at the end of the period, and it is NOT homework. It’s an in-class writing assignment. We will return to it tomorrow. You should NOT work on it as homework.

English 8-5 — I know we’re a bit behind on sonnets, but we will get caught up next week. For today (Monday 3/3), work on this assignment for conferences.

 

Homework:

For all classes except 8-5 (6th period):

Typed final draft of sonnet, poster, and link to glog/video/other added to “Sonnet Glogs” post on class website due Tuesday 3/4. Double-check to make sure your link works.

For English 8-5 (6th period): Keep working on sonnets.

Sonnet Peer Review

Sonnet Peer Review

  1. Write “Peer Reviewed by…” and sign your name at the top of the page.
  2. Check stanzas.
  3. Check rhyme scheme. Write the rhyme scheme at the end of each line.
  4. Check number of syllables per line. Write number of syllables at the end of each line.
  1. Look for all the words with more than one syllable in them. Before you look at iambic pentameter, mark the stressed and unstressed words in all the multi-syllabic words. This will ensure you know where the stress/unstress should fall for these words.
  1. Check iambic pentameter. Mark the iambic pentameter for each line.
    1. With multisyllabic words, do the stress/unstress line up with the iambic pentameter pattern? (Meaning, does the stressed syllable of the word fall where the stress should be in the pattern?)
    1. Are the important words stressed and the less important words like “the” unstressed?
    1. If there are places where the iambic pentameter break down, underline them and write “IP” next to it for “iambic pentameter.”
  1. Look at word choice. Make a note of interesting words and strong verbs. Then, underline words that should be reconsidered and write “WC” next to them for “word choice.”

Remember, iambic pentameter is like your heartbeat:

da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM…

If you are using a multisyllabic word (word with more than one syllable), the stress has to fall on the syllable that is normally stressed when you say the word out loud. You may not change how the word is said in order to fit your poem.

The English Sonnet

  • 14 lines in Iambic Pentameter.
  • Three quatrains and a couplet.
  • First three stanzas:  Quatrains (four lines each).
    • Rhyme scheme:  abab cdcd efef.
    • Quatrains tell the story.
  • Last stanza:  Couplet (two lines).
    • Rhyme scheme:  gg.
    • Couplet can make the final statement OR it can turn a corner and contradict the quatrains. You do not have to have a volta in your sonnet.

DUE TUESDAY 3/2:

TYPED, PRINTED FINAL DRAFT OF SONNET

PRINTED POSTER

LINK TO GLOG/OTHER ON THE “SONNET GLOGS” POST

I WILL NOT PRINT FOR YOU. SORRY…

Sonnet Glogs!

Leave a link to your Glog as a comment to this post. Include your first name, last initial, and section with your link.

 

DUE TUESDAY 3/2:

TYPED, PRINTED FINAL DRAFT OF SONNET

PRINTED POSTER

LINK TO GLOG/OTHER ON THE “SONNET GLOGS” POST — THAT’S THIS POST.

I WILL NOT PRINT FOR YOU. SORRY…

Sonnet Project (200 points)

Yes, you are going to write a sonnet. I know you can do it! Your subject? LOVE.  But “love” doesn’t have to mean romantic love. It could be your passion for the game of football or for riding competitions, your dedication to the violin or the stage, your love for your family or your dog, your undying devotion to chocolate chip cookies, your favorite stuffed animal, or your favorite video game. Your topic is LOVE in the abstract – you may make it concrete in any way you want.

Please follow the traditional patterns for English sonnets listed below.

Remember, iambic pentameter is like your heartbeat:

da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM…

But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?…

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?

If you are using a multisyllabic word (word with more than one syllable), the stress has to fall on the syllable that is normally stressed when you say the word out loud. You may not change how the word is said in order to fit your poem.

The English Sonnet

  • 14 lines in Iambic Pentameter.
  • Three quatrains and a couplet.
  • First three stanzas:  Quatrains (four lines each).
    • Rhyme scheme:  abab cdcd efef.
    • Quatrains tell the story.
  • Last stanza:  Couplet (two lines).
    • Rhyme scheme:  gg.
    • Couplet can make the final statement OR it can turn a corner and contradict the quatrains. You do not have to have a volta in your sonnet.

Sonnet Composition Worksheet

As you did with your haiku project, create a poster for your sonnet. Your poster should be on regular 8.5×11 paper. It should include a large image that relates to your sonnet in some way. Your poem should be in at least 16 pt. font. Please feel free to be creative with your poster!

Additionally, create a glogster for your sonnet. Include images and other multimedia that relate to and highlight your sonnet. Your glogster should be creative and original, engaging, and visually appealing. It should also be clean, neat, and easy to navigate and follow. If you would like to create other multimedia to embed in your glogster, such as an xtranormal or a voiki, please feel free; however, no matter what you create, please keep the tone in line with your poem. Create a link to your glogster on the blog; please be sure your link works! (If you would like to create something other than a glog, check with me.)

Note: If it works, a printed copy of your glogster can serve as your poster. By “if it works,” I mean if it is easy to read, if the font is large enough, and so on…

DUE TUESDAY 3/2:

TYPED, PRINTED FINAL DRAFT OF SONNET

PRINTED POSTER

LINK TO GLOG/OTHER ON THE “SONNET GLOGS” POST

I WILL NOT PRINT FOR YOU. SORRY…

Haiku Videos

Please leave a link to your haiku video as a comment to this post.

Please be sure to include your first name and last initial and your section (English 8-1, etc.) with your link.

Please double-check to make sure your link works.

Enjoy your classmates’ haiku videos — a lot of hard work went into these poems! :)

Close Reading of a Poem (50 pts)

With your groupmates, perform a close reading of your assigned poem and prepare a GooglePresentation on it. You will be the experts on the poem, and you will teach the entire class about the poem.

Read stanza by stanza, line by line, word by word. What does the poem say? What does it mean to your group? Any interpretation is a possibility — as long as you can support it with evidence from the poem.

We will work on these in class on Tuesday and return to them on Thursday (Wednesday is for peer editing haikus). Everyone in the group will be a part of the presentation to the class, meaning everyone must speak.

In your presentation:

  • Discuss what you believe the poem means.
  • Show evidence of your interpretation — point to particular parts of the poem that support your interpretation.
  • Point out interesting figurative language or other literary devices.
  • Discuss what you think the theme of the poem is — remember, theme is a SENTENCE, not a word. (See notes on theme below.)
  • If you include images, please cite them.

Ideas to help you out — look at:

(FROM http://web.uvic.ca/~englblog/closereading/)

1. DICTION (WORD CHOICE):

Pay exceedingly close attention to what individual words mean—and especially to what you think might be keywords, since this is where meaning can be concentrated.

  • Which words stand out, and why?

Consider how words may carry more than one meaning. A dictionary is obviously useful, especially one based on historical principles, since it will point to how the meanings of words may have changed over time. “Silly” once meant “helpless.”

  • Do any words carry non-contemporary or unfamiliar meanings?
  • Do any words likely carry multiple and/or ambiguous meanings?  
  • Do repeated words carry the same meaning when repeated, or do they change? Words often gather or evolve in meaning when repeated.  
  • Do particular words or phrases seem drawn to or connected with each other? These often add up so that a clearer sense of the poem emerges.
  • Do you notice lots of material or immaterial things (nouns) or lots of action (verbs)? Is the poem concrete, about specific things and places, or is the poem more abstract, about concepts or ideas? Is the poem full of movement, or does it seem to stay still and look at one thing?
  • Do certain words seem to clash with each other, and what effect does this have? Think in terms of oppositions, tensions, conflicts, and binaries.

2. TONE:

Address the tone of the speaker or narrator, which is the attitude taken by the poem’s voice toward the subject or subjects in the poem:

  • What is the attitude taken by the “voice” of the poem toward the subjects of the poem? Is the tone serious, ironic, amorous, argumentative, distant, intimate, somber, abrupt, playful, cheerful, despondent, conversational, yearning, etc.—or is it mixed, changing, ambiguous, or unclear?

3. FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE:

Related to word meaning is figurative language, which often plays a crucial role in both condensing language yet expanding meaning. Most generally, figurative language refers to language that is not literal. The phrase “fierce tears” (the personification of tears) is not literal, but it is both precise and suggestive in carrying meaning.

  • Are certain words used in unusual, non-literal, non-standard, exaggerated, or metaphorical ways? What effect do these figures of speech have?
  • Which words or phrases are used literally (they denote something literal) and which are used figuratively (they connote something figurative)? 

Much of what we read is literal: The evening sky was dark; he looked up; he felt sick. Figurative language refers to language not used literally—it is used abstractly, indirectly, and often evocatively. The evening is spread out against the sky like a patient etherized upon a table. Here we have an evening (a thing), spreading (an action), a patient (thing), etherizing (an action), and a table (thing). But an evening cannot be a drugged patient spread out upon a table, perhaps ready to be operated upon; this description cannot be literally true (there is no patient, no etherizing, no table, and evenings don’t literally spread out against skies); this language is used figuratively.

  • How does non-literal or figurative language suggest a certain meaning?
  • What mood or feeling is evoked via this figurative, non-literal language?

4. IMAGERY:

When figurative language (like metaphor or simile) provides a picture that evokes any of the senses, we call this imagery. “She is the sun” (a simile) contains imagery of light and warmth (the senses of sight and touch).

  • What imagery—pictures or senses that are evoked in words—is present in the poem? What imagery, if any, is most striking, frequent, or patterned?
  • What images seem related or connected to each other?
  • What mood or atmosphere is created by the imagery?
  • Which details stand out? Why?
  • What sense (if any) seems to dominate the poem: sight, sound, taste, touch, smell?

5. ALLUSION:

Poetry sometimes contains brief references to things outside itself—a person, place, or thing—that will expand, clarify, or complicate its meaning. Sometimes they are obvious and direct, and sometimes they are subtle, indirect, and debatable. Allusions are frequently references made to other texts (for example, to the Bible, or to another poem).

  • What allusions, if any, can you detect?
  • What effect do the allusions have upon the poem?
  • If it is a literary allusion, how does it relate to or connect with the original text?

6. SYMBOL:

symbol represents or stands for something other than the image itself. Asymbol, then, is often something concrete—a word, a thing, a place, a person (real of fictitious), an action, an event, a creation, etc.—that represents something larger, abstract, or complex—an idea, a value, a belief, an emotion. A river (a thing) can be symbol for life; Gomorrah (a place) can be a symbol of shameless sin; Homer Simpson (a fictitious person) can be a symbol of innocent stupidity; a strawberry (a thing) can be a symbol of sensual love.

  • Does the poem have any clear or central symbols? What meaning do they bring to the poem?

7. IDEAS & THEME:

  • Are the ideas of the poem simple or complex, small or large?
  • Is there one main problem in the poem? How does the poem think through that problem?
  • What are the ideas that the poem seeks to embody in images?
  • What is the poem’s process of thinking? Does it change its “mind” as it proceeds?
  • Does the poem proceed logically or illogically? Can you tell the way it is thinking, or is it unclear, opaque, and confusing?
  • How do the ideas change from line to line, stanza to stanza?
  • Does the poem offer an argument?
  • Does the poem reflect a particular experience, feeling, or concept?

“Purity” is a subject, not a theme; “purity is vulnerability” is a theme. “Theme” refers to a larger, more general, or universal message—a big idea—as well as to something that you could take away from the work and perhaps apply to life. One way to determine a theme is to

1) ask yourself what the poem is about;

2) come up with some one-word answers to that question (subjects of the poem); and

3) ask what general attitude (tone) is taken towards those subjects in the poem.

You might conclude that, for example, “love,” “trust,” or “loss” are subjects. Now, try to figure out what the attitude in the poem is toward that one-word subject and you have theme—for example, “love is dangerous,” “you cannot trust people close to you,” “loss makes you stronger.” But don’t think this is always easy or straightforward: many poems resist reduction to simple themes or even subjects, and such resistance—sometimes in the form of ambiguityparadox, abstraction, or complexity—strengthens our interest in and engagement with the poem. Poems are not necessarily answers, but they may be problems or questions.

Haiku Peer Review (or, “Boring! Ack! I hate it!”)

Haiku Project Peer Review

Open the Word doc above for instructions for the haiku peer review.

When you have completed peer review, begin revisions. Refer back to the original assignment as you prepare your final products.

FINAL DRAFT OF ENTIRE PROJECT, INCLUDING:

1. TYPED, PRINTED COPY OF ALL FOUR POEMS

2. A PRINTED POSTER OF ONE OF YOUR POEMS

3. A VIDEO OF ALL FOUR OF YOUR POEMS (POST LINK ON BLOG)

DUE MONDAY 2/24.

Notes about Haiku

Haikus do the following:

    • Capture the moment; capture the intensity of a specific moment, not a general time.
    • Focus on the concrete, real world, not the abstract realm of inner thoughts and feelings.
    • Traditionally involve nature and suggest a season.  World view is one in which nature and the observer are one, not separate.

Pattern for Haiku:

3 lines, 17 syllables

    • 1st line – 5 syllables
    • 2nd line – 7 syllables
    • 3rd line – 5 syllables

 

Past Student Haikus:

“The Lesson”

A fluttering glide,

The duck and drake race ahead,

The ducklings pursue.

 

“The Stalker”

Perched in the willow,

The owl surveys his target,

A night shadow swoops.

Analysis of l(a) by e.e. cummings.

Now that you know what the poem says literally, consider what it means to you more metaphorically. What do you think the poem means beyond the surface or literal level — what does it mean to you on a deeper more symbolic level?

Compose at least one paragraph (about 7-12 sentences). Include a topic sentence, support for your analysis with evidence from the poem itself, and a closing sentence.

Remember the concept of the persona — the narrator or speaker in the poem. You can interpret the poem in countless ways, but the interpretation is of the persona, not the poet. (Meaning, this poem may have nothing at all to do with e.e. cummings himself.)

1(a

le

af

fa

ll

s)

one

l

iness

Poetry Terms Poster Series (50 pts) – due by the end of class Wed 2/5.

Create a Poster Series:

Create a series of 8×11 posters, either by hand or online of the poetry terms you and your partner researched. Your notes should be on GoogleDrive (Click here for the original assignment.).

Posters will be hung in the hallways. Because they will be high on the wall, use at least a 18 pt font. Ensure that your poster is artistic and clearly understandable and readable. Put no more than four terms on a poster to ensure readability. You may make as many posters as you’d like, but you must have at least two.

Include on the poster:

  • term
  • definition
  • example from the poetry packet —
    • include “title”  (poem titles go in quotation marks)
    • poet’s name
    • line of the poem in which the example appears (don’t need to include line number or page number — just the actual line of the poem)
  • some kind of image, background, drawing, etc. that makes the poster visually appealing
    • please site your image with a small font link at the bottom of your poster (doesn’t need to be more than 12 pt font)

Terms:

ALLUSION

IMAGERY

SIMILE

METAPHOR

PERSONIFICATION

ONOMATOPOEIA

ALLITERATION

ASSONANCE

Ideas for Poster Creation:

GooglePresentation

glogster

wigflip

easelly

canva

Poetry Memorization and Recitations

On Wednesday 2/12 or Thursday 2/13, you will recite a poem from memory. The rubric for this memorization and recitation is here: Poetry Memorization & Recitation Rubric

Over the weekend, choose three to five that you would be interested in performing. Then, on Monday, you will be assigned to one of your choices. Only poems in this list below are options.

Because I could not stop for death –  Dickinson

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening – Frost

Jabberwocky – Caroll

The Road Not Taken – Frost

i carry your heart(i carry it in my heart) – cummings

A narrow fellow in the grass – Dickinson

Since there’s no help, come let us kiss and part – Drayton

Sonnet 18 – Shakespeare

The Passionate Shepherd to His Love – Marlowe

Sonnet 130 – Shakespeare

I hear America  singing – Whitman

At the Vietnam Memorial – Bilgere

Lenore – Poe

Annabel Lee – Poe

Do not go gentle into that good night – Thomas

“The Pickets” in Heroic Couplets

Retell “The Pickets” in Heroic Couplets.

Heroic Couplets = 2 lines that rhyme; 10 syllables per line. (Heroic Couplets are written in iambic pentameter, but we’ll worry about that later…for now, just worry about number of syllables per line and rhyme.)

Rewrite “The Pickets” in 10 Heroic Couplets — 20 lines, 10 syllables each, 10 rhyme pairs.

All group mates must take their own notes so that you may finish the assignment on your own if needed. Consider working in GoogleDocs and sharing the document will all your group mates.

ThePickets

“Slavery: A Positive Good” by John C. Calhoun

Respond to John C. Calhoun

John C. Calhoun’s “Slavery: A Positive Good” speech — Click here: Positive Good Pro-Slavery Speech

In your group of no more than three, please re-read “Slavery: A Positive Good.” Review your own “translation” of John C. Calhoun’s speech. You should have notes from your first reading.

Calhoun attempts to present five “facts.”

1. Slavery has civilized and improved Africans, physically, morally, and intellectually.

2. The South is just as virtuous as the North, even though they interact with Africans. Slavery isn’t making white people bad or inferior in any way. The South is just as good and righteous as other parts of the country.

3. Slavery has always existed in wealthy and civilized societies.

4. Americans treat slaves better than Europeans treat the poor and their working class servants.

5. The South is more stable than the North because there can be no conflict between labor and capital (between workers and bosses) in slavery. There are not workers and bosses — there are slaves and owners.

With no more than a group of three, utilizing your knowledge from American History and your impressions of Amari’s story in Copper Sun, prepare a three to five minute rebuttal to Calhoun’s speech.

Take on the persona of a US Senator from the North in 1837. You’ve heard Calhoun’s address to the Senate, and now you must take the Senate floor and reply.

Type the script of your rebuttal speech, responding to, questioning, challenging, or disproving each of Calhoun’s five facts. Address all five of Calhoun’s claims. Utilize quotes from Calhoun’s speech to help you lay out his claims and then address them one by one.

Use GoogleDocs. Share with your partners and me.

Name the file: 8-your section number Response to Calhoun partner’s names

Example: 8-1 Response to Calhoun Lily R and Camryn B

Practice giving your speech — each person in the group of no more than three must take a turn talking. You may divide up the speech as you see fit. Give your speech with conviction and eloquence.

By the end of class on Friday, make a video of your group giving your speech. Publish it to youtube (usmenglish8/wildcats) and then create a link to the “Responses to Calhoun” speeches post on this blog as a comment. Include your section, first names and last initials, and a link to your video.

Be creative with your video! Sets, costumes, eye contact, voice, enunciation, emotion, body language, and gestures are all important.

Publish to my youtube channel (usmenglish8/wildcats).

Make the name of your video the same as the name of your GoogleDoc.

Click here to post as a comment.

Poe or Doyle Flash Fiction – Final Project due Wed 12/4.

FINAL DRAFT OF STORY AND DIGITAL STORYTELLING DUE WED 12/4.

JUST A REMINDER, THIS IS A 200 POINT ASSIGNMENT.

Edgar Allan Poe or Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Flash Fiction (200 points)

For this creative writing assignment, you are asked to channel your inner Edgar Allan Poe or Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.  Following Poe’s or Doyle’s lead, you will write a “flash fiction” piece (a very short story) or poetry of your own in the horror or mystery genre.  You have creative freedom for this assignment, but here are some ideas, as well as the requirements you will need to follow.

Ideas:

  • Write a horror, suspense, or mystery story that is completely your own.
  • Write a modern-day version of one of the stories we’ve read.
  • Turn one of the short stories we’ve read into a poem or turn “The Raven” into a short story.
  • Write a backstory for one of the characters we’ve read about.

Requirements:

  1. Use vocabulary words!  You may use words from either ABC or Poe, but use at least THREE vocabulary words in your story or poetry.
  2. Whether you write poetry or a short story, you may write no fewer than 500 words and absolutely no more than 1000 words. You will include a word count with your final draft!
  3. Create a digital version of your story using a digital storytelling site or app such as Book Creator, TouchApp Creator, TouchCast, Explain Everything, Google Sites, VoiceThread, StoryKit, Scribble Press, Puppet Pals, StoryJumper, or Toontastic. We will link our stories on the class blog.
  4. Please, no gratuitous violence and absolutely no violence against classmates or other members of the USM community.

Focus on VOICE and WORD CHOICE in your writing.

IDEAS FOR DIGITAL STORYTELLING:

http://www.edudemic.com/8-powerful-apps-to-help-you-create-books-on-the-ipad/

http://fluency21.com/blog/2013/03/21/a-list-of-the-best-free-digital-storytelling-tools-for-teachers/

http://www.teachthought.com/technology/36-digital-storytelling-sites-and-apps-from-edshelf/

http://www.teachthought.com/apps-2/15-literacy-apps-to-create-books-on-the-ipad/

 

RUBRIC: Flash Fiction Rubric PDF

Investigating “The Raven”

DUE MONDAY 11/18.

PLEASE POST A LINK TO YOUR VISUAL AS A REPLY TO THIS POST.

FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS PROVIDED. THANK YOU!

Investigating “The Raven” (50 pts)

With your group, explore the topic you are given. Begin by taking careful notes in GoogleDocs (8-section# Investigating The Raven Group# Names). Then, create a thinglink, tackk, glogster, googlesiteweebly, creaza, ticklypictures, or other visual to share your group’s information with the entire class.

All Groups: Rhyme, Rhythm, and Repetition

With your group, explore the rhyme scheme, rhythm, and repetition, including alliteration, in “The Raven.”  What patterns do you discover?

Assigned Groups: Allusions and Vocabulary

With your group, explore the rich allusions and vocabulary in “The Raven.”  Do your best to identify and explain the reference or the word in the context of the poem.  Show how the reference or the allusion works in the poem. To help you identify and explain the reference or the word, consider including images, links, or anything else that would prove helpful.

For the words, include the part of speech and the definition.

Use “The Raven” links on the Poe page.

Allusions — Group One:

Raven

Pallas (41)

thy crest be shorn and shaven…craven (45)

Night’s Plutonian shore (47)

Disaster (63)

Hope (59, 65)

censer (79)

Allusions–Group Two:

seraphim (80)

nepenthe (82)

Prophet (85, 91)

Tempter (86)

tempest (86)

balm in Gilead (89)

Aidenn (93)

Vocabulary–Group Three:

dreary (1)

quaint (2)

lore (2)

bleak (7)

morrow (9, 59)

surcease (10)

entreating (16)

implore (20)

scarce (23)

lattice (33)

flirt (37)

stately (38)

yore (38)

obeisance (39)

Vocabulary–Group Four:

mien (40)

beguiling (43,67)

grave (44)

decorum (44)

craven (45)

marvelled (49)

ungainly (49)

placid (55)

aptly (61)

stock (62)

dirges (65)

melancholy (65)

fancy (43, 67, 70)

wheeled (68)

Vocabulary–Group Five:

ominous (70)

divining (75)

gloated (76)

tufted (80)

wretch (81)

respite (82)

quaff (83)

desolate (87)

undaunted (87)

laden (93)

sainted (94)

fiend (97)

plume (99)

pallid (104)

“The Masque of the Red Death” In-Class Small-Group Activities (NOT HOMEWORK!)

NOT HOMEWORK! WE WILL WORK ON THIS ACTIVITY IN CLASS.

“The Masque of the Red Death” In-Class Small Group Activity (25 points)

Google Docs:

8-# (your section number) Masque of Red Death Names (first name, last initial)

example: 8-1 Masque of Red Death Liam C Brandon S Sam

Share your Google Doc with me: lbarthwalczak@ga.usmk12.org

PART I:

In a small group of three or four, answer the following questions in GoogleDocs labeled as instructed above. Do not divide and conquer; work together on the question, finish the question together, and then move on to the next question together.

1. How is Prince Prospero characterized, meaning how is he developed as a character through his actions, his speech, his thoughts, his appearance, and others’ opinions of him – including the narrator’s opinions of him?  What specific words or phrases does Poe use to characterize Prospero?

2. Describe the clock in the black chamber.  How does the clock affect the masqueraders?  Why do the masqueraders react the way they do to the clock?  What do you think the clock symbolizes?  Support your ideas with specific evidence from the story – including page numbers!

3. Describe the stranger who appears at the masquerade.  How do Prospero and the masqueraders react to him?  Who is the stranger and why has he come to the masquerade?  What do you think the stranger symbolizes?  Support your ideas with specific evidence from the story – including page numbers!

4. What do you think happens at the climax of the story?  What happens to Prospero?  To the stranger?  To the masqueraders?

5. What do you think is the theme of the story, meaning what do you think is the main idea, central insight, underlying meaning, or commentary on society or culture?  In other words, what would you say this story is “about” – in the same way “The Cask of Amontillado” is about revenge – and what does this story say about that topic – in the same way one might ask what does “Cask” say about revenge? Support your ideas with specific evidence from the story – including page numbers!

PART II:

On the paper provided, draw, label and color a map of Prince Prospero’s seven chambers. Pay very close attention to detail, especially on pages 58 and 61. Include in your map:

  • the blue, purple, green, orange, white, violet, and black rooms — in the correct order
  • the tall and narrow Gothic windows in each chamber
  • the closed corridor that winds through the suite of rooms
  • the braziers of fire
  • the ebony clock
  • a compass rose showing the cardinal directions with North at the top of your map

Poe Vocab Quiz #2 Corrections – due Tuesday 10/29.

For every incorrect answer on the Poe Vocabulary Quiz #2, please do the following:

HANDWRITE NEATLY AND LEGIBLY. IF HANDWRITING IS AT ALL MESSY, YOU WILL BE ASKED TO REDO THE ENTIRE ASSIGNMENT.

1. Write out the word AND part of speech.

2. Write out the entire definition.

3. Write out at least one synonym and one antonym (which must be the same part of speech as the word!).

4. Write out an original sentence that demonstrates you know what the word means and how to use it correctly.

5. Draw a picture that illustrates the word and its definition. Draw an icon or symbol for the word. Please don’t illustrate the sentence; rather, draw a simple picture that will make you remember the word and its definition.

If you missed a word more than once, then please do the above more than once, each time giving a different sentence and picture.

Corrections are due: Tuesday 10/29.

Topic Sentences and Attributive Tags (for citing sources)

Remember, every paragraph includes a clear, concise, interesting, intriguing TOPIC SENTENCE. Check out these examples:

  • Edgar Allan Poe’s early life was far from what one would imagine a world-class author would have. — Walter
  • Edgar Allan Poe had a scarring, traumatic childhood; it was certainly far from perfect. – Maya
  • Edgar Allan Poe had a remarkably tough childhood, but through the hardships, he led a mysterious, but incredible, life. – Logan
  • Edgar Allan Poe had a dismal childhood, a childhood that influenced him to become one of the greatest horror authors in American literature. – Anshul
  • An American author, poet, and literary critic, Edgar Allan Poe experienced a mysterious life. – Arianna
  • Edgar Allan Poe had a dismal childhood, becoming orphaned from extreme poverty. – Cole and DJ
  • A great American horror story author, Edgar Allan Poe came from a rough background that was continuously changing. – Charlotte and Liz
  • Although Edgar Allan Poe had a difficult childhood, he pursued his dreams and became an author.  – Nick and Nate
  • The mysterious writer Edgar Allan Poe went through a very traumatic and heartbreaking childhood. – Tommy and Brandon
  • Edgar Allan Poe, one of the greatest American horror writers, had a very tragic, traumatic childhood. – Danny
  • Throughout the world, Edgar Allan Poe is known for his frightening and twisted stories, which play on human fears, weaknesses, and emotions. However, every story has a beginning, and Poe’s story begins with a horrid, tragic childhood. – Emma S and Jo
  • The childhood of Edgar Allan Poe, famous nineteenth century writer, was painful and tragic and had an everlasting impact on his writing and his life. – Matthew and Will Ko
  • A great American author, Edgar Allan Poe had a sorrowful and harrowing childhood. – Leo and Will V
  • Edgar Allan Poe is famous today for his twisted tales of astounding depth and phenomenal, but often gruesome, detail. However, everyone has a backstory, and Poe’s life was difficult from the very beginning. – Kai S
  • Mystery, horror, sadness. Edgar Allan Poe, an American horror author, experienced a very tragic childhood. – Jaci
  • Edgar Allan Poe did not have an idea childhood, as he lose many loved ones and faced poverty. – Eva
  • Edgar Allan Poe was a man of much character and grief, as tragedy follow dim in every step of his life. – Hans and Amer

Also be sure to cite your sources within your paragraphs using ATTRIBUTIVE TAGS. Check out these examples:

NOTE: If you are citing a website, cite the NAME of the website, not the URL.

  • According to the PoeStories.com website, Poe’s parents’ separation and death must have caused him a lot of sadness and strife early on. – Maya
  • According to the Edgar Allan Poe Museum’s website, John Allan was a wealthy man and sent young Edgar to many places and good schools; although Edgar always loved poetry, his adoptive father never supported it. – Nyle
  • John Allan was a successful merchant, so Poe grew up in good surroundings, according to the PoeStories.com website. Still, Poe’s relationship with his adoptive father had its rough patches. – Liz and Charlotte
  • According to Edgar Allan Poe A to Z by Dawn B. Sova, the influence his adoptive parents was a healthier one than his birth parents had. – Sophie and Kaitlyn
  • According to Karen E. Lange, author of Nevermore, Edgar Allan Poe’s adoptive parents influenced him with a stern hand but also protected him, including defending him against the truth and reality of his parents’ death. – Emma S and Jo
  • According to the PoeStories.com website, Poe grew up in friendly surroundings, and John Allan provided him with quality schooling at an early age; this early education may have greatly influenced Poe’s writing. – Will K and Matthew M
  • The Edgar Allan Poe Museum’s website states that John Allan was a wealthy tobacco merchant, and that is the reason Edgar was able to attend a very good quality school to learn to study poetry.
  • According to Edgar Allan Poe by Thomas Streissguth, Poe’s father David Poe was very distant and left his family the same year his wife, Poe’s mother, passed away.

Find more information about citing sources here.

The Life and Times of Edgar Allan Poe – Complete final draft due Wed 10/30.

Who was — who is — Edgar Allan Poe? That is the question you’ll answer in the Life and TImes of Poe Project.

Project Assignment:

Life and Times of Poe Project

Project Rubric:

Life and Times of Poe Rubric

Due Date for complete final draft of the entire project: Wednesday 10/30/13. 
Before submitting anything, please make sure you double- and triple-check that your project meets (and hopefully exceeds!) all requirements and expectations by consulting both the project assignment sheet and the rubric.

“The Tell-Tale Heart” Criminal Minds – New due date: Thurs 10/24.

DUE THURS 10/24 VIA GOOGLEDOCS.

Utilize the Interrogation Report (Tell-Tale Heart Interrogation Report) to submit your work to the precinct captain via GoogleDocs. Upload your final Word doc to GoogleDocs and share it with me: lbarthwalczak@ga.usmk12.org.

Label your GoogleDoc: 8-# Criminal Minds Detectives Names.

Example: 8-1 Criminal Minds Detectives Lily R and Liam C

You and your partner are both seasoned, street-smart members of the Behavioral Analysis Unit, “an elite team of FBI profilers who analyze the country’s most twisted criminal minds, anticipating their next moves before they strike again.” You’ve been called to a grisly crime scene to interrogate a murder suspect. Walking in, all you know is that the suspect is accused of murdering an elderly man, and when the cops found him, he was yelling about some kind of heartbeat…

With your partner, submit an Interrogation Report.  Answer the following questions in the “Narrative of Interrogation” section. Write in first-person point of view in the voice of an FBI profiler.

1. One of your first priorities is to establish whether or not you can believe what the suspect tells you. Explain what behaviors, language, or other signals you look for to determine whether or not the suspect is telling the unmitigated truth. How will you be able to tell whether or not you can trust the suspect’s version of events?

2. Explain your first impressions of the suspect. Re-read the first paragraph of “The Tell-Tale Heart” (page 74). What does it tell us about the narrator? What later event(s) does it foreshadow?

3. The suspect continually insists that he’s not “mad.” Look through the story and find THREE separate times when the narrator insists he is not mad. Copy the sentences with the page numbers on your interrogation report.  How does he seem to define “madness,” or in other words, what does the suspect identify as the characteristics of madness? Does his definition of “madness” match your own understanding of madness as a criminal profiler? Why or why not?

4. The suspect describes the police officers who discovered his crime. The narrator says the officers “chatted pleasantly, and smiled” (page 78). Does this description seem plausible to you — do you think the officers would agree with this description? What do you think the police officers in the story were thinking when they were with the narrator?

5. What is your final analysis of the crime scene and the suspect? What insight do you have into his mind? In other words, what do you think were his true motives, why do you think he committed the crime, and do you think he would strike again?

Tell-Tale Heart Interrogation Report

Citing Your Sources.

For the Life and Times of Poe Project:

Within your entries, if you use a source’s exact words or phrases or if you use a source’s original ideas that you would not find anywhere else, you must use quotation marks if appropriate and cite the source in the paragraph. If you are citing general information, like his birthday or the day of his death or information that can be found in multiple sources, you do not have to cite the source in the paragraph, but rather you can just include the source on the bibliography.

Cite your sources using attributive tags!

  • Whenever you use information you’ve found in a source, you need to explain where the information is from.  This is called “citing.”
  • The first time you use a source in your essay, introduce the source with a little more detail.   Give the name of the source, the name of the author, and any additional important information.
  • Every time you quote or paraphrase information from a source, cite the information with at least the author’s name, or if no author, the title.  You need to do so whether you are directly quoting or paraphrasing your source.
  • If you are quoting a source word for word or if you are using a word or phrase that you found in your source, you must use quotation marks.
  • Use MLA style to cite your sources!  If you are citing an online source, you may not have a page number to include.

Good attributive tags for citing information:

According to  __________, author of the book __________, . . . (pg#).

In the article __________, author __________ explains that . . . (pg#).

The website __________ states that . . .

On the website __________, author __________ writes that . . .

__________, author of the webpage __________, states that . . .

The webpage __________ suggests that . . .

Change up the way you introduce your sources and cite your information!

See examples of effective topic sentences and attributive tags here.

Reflections on our Skype with Gene Yang

On Monday 9/30, we had the exciting opportunity to Skype with Gene Yang. As a “comment” to this blog post, please reflect on our questions and Mr. Yang’s answers and compose a well-written paragraph on what you learned or realized in our talk. Consider, what did you find interesting? What did you find surprising? Were your ideas about ABC challenged or confirmed? What did you take away from the Skype with Gene Yang?

Responses should be at least one well-written paragraph, about 8-12 sentences long, with a clear topic sentence, sentence fluency and variety, descriptive word choices, and specific examples and details. Please proofread for grammar and conventions, as well. Your response may be longer than one paragraph.

I challenge you to use the sentence composing tools we’ve learned this year — opening adjective and adverbs, delayed adjectives and adverbs, and absolute phrases. I also challenge you to use vocabulary words.

Compose, peer review, and revise your paragraph in GoogleDocs, Word, or Pages. When your paragraph is complete and you are confident in your final draft, then copy and paste it onto the blog.

Include your name (first name, last initial) and section at the top of your response.

This response is a graded formal writing assignment, worth 25 points. Moreover, a link to all of our responses will be forwarded to Gene Yang and First Second Books.

The video of our Skype, which is password protected, can be found on vimeo: http://vimeo.com/usmenglish8/geneyangskype2013. See me for the password.

Here are the questions we asked Gene Yang:

2013 Skype with Gene Yang Questions

The Adventures of the Monkey King (25 points – due Monday 9/30)

Create your own comic about the Monkey King.  You may depict a scene from Journey to the West, explore what happens before or after the events of American Born Chinese, or write an original story.  Just stay true to the essence of the Monkey King.  Be creative and take risks, even if you don’t think of yourself as “artistic.”  Your work is evaluated for artistic effort and integrity!

 Requirements:

  • Must be at least six panels long. The size and arrangement of your panels is up to you.
  • Must be in color.  If you create your comic on the computer, either print in color or print and then color in by hand.
  • Must use at least TWO ABC vocabulary words. Show you know what the words mean and how to use them appropriately.
  • Spelling, grammar, and mechanics count! Write rough drafts and proofread as you would for any writing assignment before creating your final draft.
  • You will turn in a hard copy, so if you create on the computer, please print!

Due Date: Monday, September 30th.

ABC pages 201-233 Discussion Questions

Please discuss the following in groups of no more than three. Create a GoogleDoc together to compose your responses. Share the GoogleDoc with me: lbarthwalczak@ga.usmk12.org — make sure you add the “ga”!

NAME YOUR GOOGLEDOC: 8-# ABC 201-233 FIRST NAMES AND LAST INITIALS FOR EVERY GROUP MEMBER

8-YOUR SECTION NUMBER ABC 201-233 EVERYONE’S FIRST NAMES AND LAST INITIALS

EXAMPLE: 8-1 ABC 201-233 LILY R, CAMRYN B, LIAM C

Please take your time and answer the questions thoughtfully and thoroughly. Demonstrate your EIGHTH GRADE LEVEL critical thinking, discussion, and writing skills. No seventh grade level work here. Step it up to eighth grade level.

PLEASE DO NOT DIVIDE AND CONQUER! YOUR GOAL IS TO DISCUSS THESE QUESTIONS.

1. Words of the Wiser — What are the words of the wiser in pages 201-233. First, list the words of the wiser statements WITH PAGE NUMBERS. Second, answer these questions:

  • Who is the wiser now?
  • What has he learned? What does he teach us?
  • Who is the learner now?
  • What has he learned?
  • Think of all of the words of the wiser from the entire novel — what are the important themes of this novel?

2. Again and again — Transformation. Where does transformation occur in 201-233? How does this transformation relate to what we’ve already seen in the novel? What does the novel seem to say about transformation?

3. Again and again — What other examples of again and again come up in 201-233? What do you think these again and agains mean or symbolize?

4. What did you see, realize, learn, or understand now that you’ve RE-READ ABC?

ABC pages 133-198 Discussion Questions

Please discuss the following in groups of no more than three. Create a GoogleDoc together to compose your responses. Share the GoogleDoc with me: lbarthwalczak@ga.usmk12.org — make sure you add the “ga”!

NAME YOUR GOOGLEDOC: 8-# ABC 133-198 FIRST NAMES AND LAST INITIALS FOR EVERY GROUP MEMBER

8-YOUR SECTION NUMBER ABC 133-198 EVERYONE’S FIRST NAMES AND LAST INITIALS

EXAMPLE: 8-1 ABC 133-198 LILY R, CAMRYN B, LIAM C

Please take your time and answer the questions thoughtfully and thoroughly. Demonstrate your EIGHTH GRADE LEVEL critical thinking, discussion, and writing skills. No seventh grade level work here. Step it up to eighth grade level.

PLEASE DO NOT DIVIDE AND CONQUER! YOUR GOAL IS TO DISCUSS THESE QUESTIONS.

1. Again and again — Names, saying “I am” or “I am not,” saying “you are” or “you are not” — these things come up again and again in pages 133-198. First, list all of the occurrences of names, I am/not, you are/not WITH PAGE NUMBERS. Second, answer these questions:

  • Why are names and saying one is or is not something significant? What is the symbolic or metaphorical significance of such things?
  • Why keep bringing these things up again and again? What is the meaning?
  • HINT: LOOK AT HOW MONKEY KING REFERS TO WONG LAI-TSAO (THE MONK).

2. Words of the Wiser — What are the words of the wiser in pages 133-198. First, list the words of the wiser statements WITH PAGE NUMBERS. Second, answer these questions:

  • What is Wong Lai-Tsao (the Monk) trying to teach the Monkey King?
  • How do the Monk’s words of the wiser reinforce what Tze-Yo-Tzuh has tried to teach the Monkey King?
  • What does the Monkey King learn? How does he seem to learn this lesson?
  • What does the herbalist’s wife try to teach Jin?
  • What does Jin learn? How does he seem to learn this lesson? How did Jin “forfeit his soul”?
  • How do these lessons establish the theme of the entire novel?

3. Again and again — Shoes and Hair. First, list all occurrences of when attention is called to shoes and/or hair in pages 133-198. Second, explain the symbolic significance of the shoes and hair. How is Jin’s hair similar to the Monkey King’s shoes? What, if anything, does the Monkey King learn from his shoes? What, if anything, does Jin learn from his hair?

4. Again and again — Mandarin vs. English. Look at what is said in Mandarin versus what is said in English in pages 133-198, particularly in the fight between Jin and Wei-Chen. Why do certain things get said in Mandarin? Why do certain things get said in English? How is this conversation and use of language similar/different to the first conversation Jin and Wei-Chen have way back when they first met in elementary school?

5. Again and again — Transformation. Where does transformation occur in 133-198? How does this transformation relate to what we’ve already seen in the novel?

Vocabulary Quiz “Corrections”

For every question you missed on the vocabulary quiz for any reason, please do the following:

HANDWRITE

1. The word.

2. The part(s) of speech.

3. The definition(s).

4. One of the sentences in which it’s used in American Born Chinese with page number.

5. A new, original sentence of your own showing you know what the word means and how to use it. Do not use the same sentence you used on the quiz or on the sentence/drawing assignment you had for these words.

6. Underline the word in the sentences (from the book and your own).

If you missed a word more than once, DO ALL OF THE ABOVE for each time you missed it. Rewrite the word, recopy the part of speech, definition, and sentence from book, and come up with another original sentence.

Neatness, handwriting, grammar and spelling all count.

Absolute Phrases

Absolute Phrases (pages 38-39 of the green grammar book) —

Give additional information or detail…About what is happening at that same time…Giving us a better picture of what is going on.

Absolutes are almost complete sentences; you can make an absolute a complete sentence by adding was or were.

Absolutes often start with possessive pronouns (my, his, her, its, our, their). Possessive pronouns can be stated (visible) or implied.

Practice Absolute Phrases —

Green grammar book homework for Monday 9/23:

Page 40 Practice 3

Page 41 Practice 4 — Write your own imitation of ALL THREE SENTENCES. Don’t just choose one; do ALL THREE.

Page 41-42 Practice 5

Please be sure to follow all of the instructions. Again, for Practice 4, write your own imitation for ALL THREE.

Type or handwrite on paper. Please do not write in the book.

Need help with Absolutes? Look at the links on the writing page of the blog.

Topical allusions in ABC to research

With a partner or a group of three, research the following topics. Create a GoogleDoc to take notes on your research of each topic. Share it with your partner(s).

Name the GoogleDoc:

8-# ABC Topical Allusions Group Members’ Names (First Name, Last Initial)

Example: 8-1 ABC Topical Allusions Lily R Eden E

TOPICS:

Pat Oliphant

Chinese-American Spy Plane Crisis of 2001

Pat Oliphant’s political cartoon about the spy plane crisis

Long Duk Dong in the movie Sixteen Candles

Fu Man Chu books

William Hung on “American Idol”

S.A.R.S.

RESOURCES:

Check out links here.

Check out the Yang page of this blog for more links.

Restrictive Portrayals of Asians in the Media and How to Balance Them from MANAA

ABC pages 55-84 Discussion Questions

Please discuss the following in groups of no more than three. Create a GoogleDoc together to compose your responses. Share the GoogleDoc with me: lbarthwalczak@ga.usmk12.org — make sure you add the “ga”!

NAME YOUR GOOGLEDOC: 8-# ABC 55-84 FIRST NAMES AND LAST INITIALS FOR EVERY GROUP MEMBER

8-YOUR SECTION NUMBER ABC 55-84 EVERYONE’S FIRST NAMES AND LAST INITIALS

EXAMPLE: 8-1 ABC 55-84 LILY R, CAMRYN B, LIAM C

Please take your time and answer the questions thoughtfully and thoroughly. Demonstrate your EIGHTH GRADE LEVEL critical thinking, discussion, and writing skills. No seventh grade level work here. Step it up to eighth grade level.

1. Again and again — Names, saying “I am” or “I am not,” saying “you are” or “you are not” — these things come up again and again in pages 55-84. First, list all of the occurrences of names, I am/not, you are/not WITH PAGE NUMBERS. Second, answer these questions:

  • Why are names and saying one is or is not something significant? What is the symbolic or metaphorical significance of such things?
  • Why keep bringing these things up again and again? What is the meaning?
  • NOTE: On page 76, MK has written “The Great Sage, Equal of Heaven was here” on the golden pillar. On page 84, the seal that keeps MK from practicing kung-fu reads “Tze-Yo-Tzuh”; the seal is TYT’s name.

2. Words of the Wiser — What are the words of the wiser in pages 55-84. First, list the words of the wiser statements WITH PAGE NUMBERS. Second, answer these questions:

  • What is Tze-Yo-Tzuh trying to teach the Monkey King?
  • How do these lessons establish the theme of the entire novel?

3. Again and again — Shoes. First, list all occurrences of shoes in pages 1-84 (all we’ve read in class so far). Second, explain the symbolic significance of the shoes. What’s up with the shoes?

On the board, we’ll share what we think are the most significant moments with names and the most important words of the wiser (with page numbers!).

Sentences and Pictures for ABC Vocabulary

On piece of paper prepared in class today, for each of the ten vocab words plus the two words you chose for yourself, do the following:

1. A picture that represents the word, as if you are making an icon of the word. Draw a picture that would make you think of the word or that would explain the word.

2. A sentence with the word, showing you know what it means and how to use it.

The picture and sentence are not related. The picture should stand alone apart from the sentence and still make sense. You’re not illustrating the sentence, but rather coming up for a picture of the word and then separately coming up with a sentence for the word.

You may change the form or tense of the words.

Due: Monday 9/16.

Practice with Delayed Adjectives

Remember, adverbs describe an action — how, where, or when an action happens. See page 30 in your green grammar book.

Please write five sentences using delayed adverbs. Delayed adverbs may come in the middle or at the end of the sentence, after the action they describe. Set them off with commas. You may choose any adverbs you like. Be creative! :)

If you’re desperate for adverbs, you can check this list: http://www.momswhothink.com/reading/list-of-adverbs.html.

Practice Writing with Delayed Adjectives

What’s a delayed adjective? See page 18 of your green grammar book.

Go to the Random Adjective Generator.

Set “Quantity” to 5.

Keep “Duplicates” unchecked.

Hit “Refresh List” to generate your list of 5 adjectives.

Now, write five sentence, using each one of the five as a delayed adjective. If you don’t know what a word means, look it up! : )

Be prepared to share your sentences with the class on Monday 9/9.

Practice Writing with Opening Adjectives

What’s an opening adjective? See page 12 of your green grammar book (aka G4MS, ie the-would-be-zombie-apocalypse-starting-weird-lab-sounding-chemical-name book).

Go to the Random Adjective Generator.

Set “Quantity” to 5.

Keep “Duplicates” unchecked.

Hit “Refresh List” to generate your list of 5 adjectives.

Now, write five sentence, using each one of the five as an opening adjective. If you don’t know what a word means, look it up! : )

Be prepared to share your sentences with the class on Friday 9/6.

Summer Reading Poster

Make a poster for your choice summer reading book to hang in the hallways! SummerReadingBookPosterAssignment

Due dates:

  • Rough draft due Wednesday 9/4. Have your poster Wednesday so that you can get some feedback on it.
  • Final draft due Thursday 9/5. Print your final copy BEFORE you come to class. If you come to class without your hard copy, it will be considered LATE and will lose points. No excuses!
  • Book Talks on Thursday 9/5 and Friday 9/6. Come ready to do a brief (3 minute) talk about your choice — think of how Mrs. E. does book talks! Your book talk with be evaluated, so please prepare. It’s not an “off the cuff” impromptu talk.