Reflection!

In your new English folder, create a document called:

8-# (your section number) English Reflection your name

example: 8-1 English Reflection Lily R.

 

Then, answer the following questions. Please write with detail and specificity. I will take your reflections into consideration as I determine your final grade in 8th grade English.

 

1. Make a Top 5 list of things you’ve learned in 8th grade English.

2. Think back over the texts we’ve read this year. What words of the wiser did you encounter? How do these themes relate to you or your life?

3. What did you come to understand in the process of creating your final project (your monologue)? About the novel? About the history? About the world?

4. Explain how you went about creating your monologue. How did you capture the character? How did you find a purpose or make a point? How did you learn their voice? Now that you know your character so well, tell us about him or her. What is his or her single-most important characteristic?

5. Compose a haiku summarizing your experience in 8th grade English.

 

This reflection is due on Monday 6/9.

Make sure your monologue has…

1. Scenario — Set up the context for the monologue. Do all your introducing here.

2. Setting — When the curtain goes up, what will the audience see? Remember, setting is not just location but also atmosphere and mood.

3. An interesting, attention-grabbing first line.

4. A memorable, thought-provoking final line.

5. A range of emotion.

6. Realistic body language and movements.

7. Voice and Word Choice. Every line, ask yourselves, is this what my character would say? Would my character use this word? Would my character express him/herself in this way?

Monologue First Draft Peer Review – in class on Friday 5/30.

CHOOSE A PARTNER FOR PEER REVIEW AND SHARE YOUR CHARACTER SKETCHES AND YOUR ROUGH DRAFTS OF YOUR MONOLOGUES IN GOOGLEDOCS.

FIRST, READ THROUGH THE CHARACTER SKETCH AND THE SCENARIO ESTABLISHING THE CONTEXT AND THE SETTING OF THE MONOLOGUE ONLY. DO NOT READ THE REST OF THE MONOLOGUE YET!

1. Read through your partner’s character sketch for their monologue. Based on this character sketch, what three words would you use to describe the character?

2. Read the scenario that explains what is happening when the monologue takes place and the setting that describes what the audience will see when the character is speaking. Based on this background information that the writer has provided, what do you expect the setting to be like? Describe it in your own words. What do you imagine in your mind when you read these things?

3. Tell your partner what you said for #1 and #2. Is your perception as an audience member the one that the writer wanted you to have? If it’s not – if your ideas are way off from what the writer was thinking – they will need to revise accordingly.

4. Knowing the context and setting of the monologue, what emotions do you expect to see portrayed by the character? What gestures, expressions, tone of voice, movements, and so on do you expect to see?

5. What point do you expect the character to make? How do you think the monologue will end?

6. Tell your partner what you said for #4 and #5.

 

NOW, READ THE MONOLOGUE.

7. What are the purpose and the point of the monologue? Summarize its purpose and point in one to two complete sentences. If you can’t summarize them in a few sentences, then maybe they’re not clear and the writer needs to work on them.

8. Tell your partner what you said for #7. Ask your partner to explain in their own words what they think the purpose and the point are.

 

NOW THAT YOU KNOW WHO THE CHARACTER IS, WHAT THE CHARACTER IS LIKE, WHAT THE CONTEXT AND SETTING ARE, AND WHAT THE PURPOSE AND POINT ARE, REREAD THE MONOLOGUE A SECOND TIME.

9. Find five rich, effective, strong lines. Underline them and compliment your partner on them

10. Find five dull or flat lines and offer stronger, more powerful alternatives. Bold the original and then type the replacement next to it. Bold your replacement, too

11. Identify any parts of the monologue that need more detail or more description, that are confusing, or that don’t seem to work in your opinion. Bold these. Explain to your partner what you think isn’t working in these parts.

12. Identify any parts of the monologue that need clearer stage direction. Can you clearly imagine what the character is doing, what they look like, what expression is on their face, and so on? Bold any places where you think more specific, detailed stage direction is needed. Explain to your partner what you think is needed in these parts.

 

WHEN YOU HAVE COMPLETED THE PEER REVIEW, PLEASE BEGIN REVISING YOUR MONOLOGUE.

A COMPLETE, REVISED, NEAR POLISHED SECOND ROUGH DRAFT IS DUE ON MONDAY 6/2.

PLEASE USE YOUR TIME WISELY. REMEMBER, THIS IS YOUR FINAL PROJECT.

 

 

 

 

Character Sketch Activity – in class on Wed 5/28 – (50 pts)

Now that you have decided whose skin you’re going to walk around in for your monologue project, please complete the character sketch below.

Use GoogleDocs. Label it: your section, Character Sketch of character name, by Your Name

example: 8-1 Character Sketch of Mayella Ewell by Lily Robinson

Submit your assignment in your NEW English folder (the same one in which you submitted your Tom Robinson/Tim Johnson paper).

You may write in bullet points. You do not need to write in complete sentences.

Character Sketch:

1. Who is your character?

2. What do you know about your character (from the novel)? If it is a major character about whom you know a lot, then summarize the key points. Think age, gender, race, class, occupation—the basic facts.

3. With whom in the book does your character have a relationship? What is the relationship? If you have a major character who has relationships with the majority of the characters in the book, then list only the important relationships.

4. How do others (particularly Scout) feel about your character?

5. What are at least three traits very specific to your character? Why do you think your character has developed these very particular traits?

6. What is one of your character’s prejudices, meaning what is a bias your character holds against others? Explain that character’s prejudice.

7. Are there any prejudices or biases your character faces, meaning are they the victim of prejudice or bias? Explain the prejudices your character faces.

8. What is your character’s greatest strength and greatest weakness? Explain.

 

This activity adapted from one at http://mrfidlerswebsite.net.

 

End of the Year Dates

Wednesday 5/28 — 8th period:

Closing Ceremony rehearsal in MS Gym.

Thursday 5/29 — 2:30 to 3:15:

Students returning to Upper School attend Fall Sports/Play assembly in US Gym.

Students not returning go to Dr. Walczak’s classroom for study hall.

Friday 5/30:

First rough draft of Mockingbird Monologue project due.

Monday 6/2:

Second rough draft of Mockingbird Monologues project due.

Tuesday 6/3 — 8th period:

8th grade Awards Ceremony in Theatre.

Thursday 6/5:

Special lunch and yearbook signing.

Friday 6/6 — Full day of school:

World Languages project/exam during World Languages classes. Regular classes in all other subjects.

In-class performances for those who choose to perform their monologue live to the class in English.

Monday 6/9 — Full day of school:

FINAL DRAFT OF ENTIRE MOCKINGBIRD MONOLOGUES PROJECT, INCLUDING SCRIPT, VIDEO, AND REFLECTION DUE AND COMPREHENSIVE VOCABULARY FINAL EXAM during English classes.

Tuesday 6/10 — Exam Day schedule (8:15 to 10:30):

Math Exam.

Wednesday 6/11 (12:00 to 3:00):

12:00 Optional individual graduation photos.

12:30 Chorus sound check.

1:15 Mandatory group graduation photo.

2:00 Closing Ceremony.

Final Project: The Mockingbird Monologues (500 points)

Atticus tells Scout that if she can “learn a simple trick,” she will “get along a lot better with all kinds of folks” (33). Atticus says, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…until you climb into his skin and walk around in it” (33). That’s exactly what you are going to do for your final project.

As your final project, you will write and perform a monologue based on a character from Harper Lee’sTo Kill a Mockingbird.

You will embody a character, taking on his/her traits, beliefs, attitudes, fears, and feelings as your own.

Choose one of the following options:

a) Write a monologue from a moment that doesn’t actually occur in the book (before the book starts, one that isn’t fully described in the book, or an epilogue that takes place after the book ends).

OR

b) The novel is told from Scout’s perspective. Choose one other character in the novel and write a monologue of his/her inner thoughts during a key moment in the plot.

 

Written Script Requirements:

The monologue must be 3-5 minutes in length (when it is performed).

Write in proper script format (use A Midsummer Night’s Dream for formatting). Use this link to the template on GoogleDocs.

Write a brief scenario (1-2 paragraphs) describing the situation or what has occurred before the start of your monologue. This comes before your description of your setting in your script. This is written only; you will not perform this introduction.

Include stage directions (describe movement, name the emotion the character is experiencing as they speak or describe the way that the character is speaking).

Your monologue must reflect your character’s life story, as told in the novel and as supplemented by you, including but not limited to the following: manner of speaking, vocabulary, voice, attitude, appearance, clothing, age, career or other community role, socioeconomic background, etc. While you may add new information to create a rounder character, you may not contradict anything in the novel.

Your monologue must be historically accurate and should reflect the historical, cultural, and social context of the time period.

Your monologue will be almost like a missing scene from the novel; we’ll see but the only person speaking will be your character. The goal is to show the audience what your character was really thinking inside when certain events from the novel happened.

You get to choose what your character says and the underlying circumstances for the monologue (when, where, and why your character says what s/he does). You even get to make up a backstory that sheds new light on your character—just so long as the new facts you add do not contradict the facts presented in the novel.

A template for writing your monologue can be found on Google Drive. Click here.

 

Performance Requirements:

The monologue must be memorized if performed live or must appear to be memorized if recorded.

The monologue must be well-rehearsed and polished.

The performance must include costumes and props appropriate to the characters and the monologue.

The performance must be in character. Use voice and movement that reflects the character.

The video and audio quality of the recording must be high; there can be no background noise, shaky cameras, and so on.

Any editing of the video must be done as seamlessly as possible. The video should look professional, not like something you hastily created at the last minute.

If you are not proficient in recording or editing movies, please ask for help from someone who is.

 

Characteristics of Powerful Monologues:

  • Have and make a clear point.
  • Reveal the character’s inner thoughts, feelings, tensions, anxieties, and desires.
  • Portray powerful and personal emotions.
  • May show change in the character – whether a change in heart or attitude.
  • Use a variety of tones.
    • A monologue that starts in one place and ends up somewhere entirely different will make the tension more dramatic, the characters more compelling, and your script much better.
    • A good monologue should be alternatively funny, harrowing, and touching, pointing on no one emotion or no one state by itself.
  • Have a clear beginning, middle, and end.
    • Even if the character is not changed significantly, perhaps their decision to speak up is a change in and of itself. A taciturn character driven to a long monologue is revealing, when deployed properly. Why have they spoken up now? How does this change the way we feel about them?
    • Consider allowing the character to change as they speak over the course of their monologue. If a character starts in a rage, it might be more interesting for their to end in hysterics, or laughter. If they start out laughing, maybe they end up contemplative. Use the monologue as a vessel for change.
    • If it’s a story, it needs to have an arc. If it’s a rant, it needs to change into something else. If it’s a plea, it needs to up the ante over the course of its pleading.
    • The beginning of a good monologue will hook the audience and the other characters. The beginning should signal that something important is happening.
    • In the middle, the monologue should climax. Build it to its maximum height and then bring it back down to lower the tension and allow the conversation between the characters to continue or end entirely. This is where the specific details, the drama, and the tangents in the monologue will occur.
    • The ending should bring the speech or the story back around to the play at hand. The tension of the monologue is relieved and the scene ends on that note of finality.

 

Reflection:

After writing and performing your monologue, you will write a two- to three-page reflection on what you have learned not only in studying To Kill a Mockingbird and completing this Mockingbird Monologues project, but all what you have learned throughout the entire year in 8th grade English. Full detailed questions to be answered in your reflection will be provided.

 

Rubric:

Mockingbird Monologue Rubric PDF

 

DUE DATES:

1ST ROUGH DRAFT OF MONOLOGUE DUE: FRIDAY, MAY 30TH.

2ND ROUGH DRAFT OF MONOLOGUE (REVISED FROM 1ST ROUGH DRAFT) DUE: MONDAY, JUNE 2ND.

IN-CLASS PERFORMANCES FOR THOSE WHO CHOOSE TO PERFORM: FRIDAY, JUNE 6TH.

FINAL DRAFT OF ENTIRE PROJECT, INCLUDING SCRIPT, VIDEO, AND REFLECTION DUE: MONDAY, JUNE 9TH.

IF YOU COMPLETE THE PROJECT EARLY AND WOULD LIKE TO PERFORM OR SHOW YOUR VIDEO TO THE CLASS BEFORE FRIDAY, JUNE 6TH, YOU ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE EXTRA CREDIT. EXTRA CREDIT WILL BE AWARDED BASED UPON THE QUALITY OF THE PROJECT. FINISHING EARLY DOES NOT GUARANTEE EXTRA CREDIT.

 

HELP:

The Horton Foote script of the film version of TKAM

Template for monologue script formatting

Pre-Writing Help: Mockingbird Monologue Pre-Writing Worksheets — These are Word docs that you can upload into GoogleDocs.

 

Dr. Walczak adapted ideas found in these sources:

wikihow.com/Make-a-Monologue

msgallin9300.wordpress.com

mathman.dreamhosters.com

mrfidlerswebsite.net