Reflection!

In your new English folder, create a document called:

8-# (your section number) English Reflection your name

example: 8-1 English Reflection Lily R.

 

Then, answer the following questions. Please write with detail and specificity. I will take your reflections into consideration as I determine your final grade in 8th grade English.

 

1. Make a Top 5 list of things you’ve learned in 8th grade English.

2. Think back over the texts we’ve read this year. What words of the wiser did you encounter? How do these themes relate to you or your life?

3. What did you come to understand in the process of creating your final project (your monologue)? About the novel? About the history? About the world?

4. Explain how you went about creating your monologue. How did you capture the character? How did you find a purpose or make a point? How did you learn their voice? Now that you know your character so well, tell us about him or her. What is his or her single-most important characteristic?

5. Compose a haiku summarizing your experience in 8th grade English.

 

This reflection is due on Monday 6/9.

Make sure your monologue has…

1. Scenario — Set up the context for the monologue. Do all your introducing here.

2. Setting — When the curtain goes up, what will the audience see? Remember, setting is not just location but also atmosphere and mood.

3. An interesting, attention-grabbing first line.

4. A memorable, thought-provoking final line.

5. A range of emotion.

6. Realistic body language and movements.

7. Voice and Word Choice. Every line, ask yourselves, is this what my character would say? Would my character use this word? Would my character express him/herself in this way?

Monologue First Draft Peer Review – in class on Friday 5/30.

CHOOSE A PARTNER FOR PEER REVIEW AND SHARE YOUR CHARACTER SKETCHES AND YOUR ROUGH DRAFTS OF YOUR MONOLOGUES IN GOOGLEDOCS.

FIRST, READ THROUGH THE CHARACTER SKETCH AND THE SCENARIO ESTABLISHING THE CONTEXT AND THE SETTING OF THE MONOLOGUE ONLY. DO NOT READ THE REST OF THE MONOLOGUE YET!

1. Read through your partner’s character sketch for their monologue. Based on this character sketch, what three words would you use to describe the character?

2. Read the scenario that explains what is happening when the monologue takes place and the setting that describes what the audience will see when the character is speaking. Based on this background information that the writer has provided, what do you expect the setting to be like? Describe it in your own words. What do you imagine in your mind when you read these things?

3. Tell your partner what you said for #1 and #2. Is your perception as an audience member the one that the writer wanted you to have? If it’s not – if your ideas are way off from what the writer was thinking – they will need to revise accordingly.

4. Knowing the context and setting of the monologue, what emotions do you expect to see portrayed by the character? What gestures, expressions, tone of voice, movements, and so on do you expect to see?

5. What point do you expect the character to make? How do you think the monologue will end?

6. Tell your partner what you said for #4 and #5.

 

NOW, READ THE MONOLOGUE.

7. What are the purpose and the point of the monologue? Summarize its purpose and point in one to two complete sentences. If you can’t summarize them in a few sentences, then maybe they’re not clear and the writer needs to work on them.

8. Tell your partner what you said for #7. Ask your partner to explain in their own words what they think the purpose and the point are.

 

NOW THAT YOU KNOW WHO THE CHARACTER IS, WHAT THE CHARACTER IS LIKE, WHAT THE CONTEXT AND SETTING ARE, AND WHAT THE PURPOSE AND POINT ARE, REREAD THE MONOLOGUE A SECOND TIME.

9. Find five rich, effective, strong lines. Underline them and compliment your partner on them

10. Find five dull or flat lines and offer stronger, more powerful alternatives. Bold the original and then type the replacement next to it. Bold your replacement, too

11. Identify any parts of the monologue that need more detail or more description, that are confusing, or that don’t seem to work in your opinion. Bold these. Explain to your partner what you think isn’t working in these parts.

12. Identify any parts of the monologue that need clearer stage direction. Can you clearly imagine what the character is doing, what they look like, what expression is on their face, and so on? Bold any places where you think more specific, detailed stage direction is needed. Explain to your partner what you think is needed in these parts.

 

WHEN YOU HAVE COMPLETED THE PEER REVIEW, PLEASE BEGIN REVISING YOUR MONOLOGUE.

A COMPLETE, REVISED, NEAR POLISHED SECOND ROUGH DRAFT IS DUE ON MONDAY 6/2.

PLEASE USE YOUR TIME WISELY. REMEMBER, THIS IS YOUR FINAL PROJECT.

 

 

 

 

Character Sketch Activity – in class on Wed 5/28 – (50 pts)

Now that you have decided whose skin you’re going to walk around in for your monologue project, please complete the character sketch below.

Use GoogleDocs. Label it: your section, Character Sketch of character name, by Your Name

example: 8-1 Character Sketch of Mayella Ewell by Lily Robinson

Submit your assignment in your NEW English folder (the same one in which you submitted your Tom Robinson/Tim Johnson paper).

You may write in bullet points. You do not need to write in complete sentences.

Character Sketch:

1. Who is your character?

2. What do you know about your character (from the novel)? If it is a major character about whom you know a lot, then summarize the key points. Think age, gender, race, class, occupation—the basic facts.

3. With whom in the book does your character have a relationship? What is the relationship? If you have a major character who has relationships with the majority of the characters in the book, then list only the important relationships.

4. How do others (particularly Scout) feel about your character?

5. What are at least three traits very specific to your character? Why do you think your character has developed these very particular traits?

6. What is one of your character’s prejudices, meaning what is a bias your character holds against others? Explain that character’s prejudice.

7. Are there any prejudices or biases your character faces, meaning are they the victim of prejudice or bias? Explain the prejudices your character faces.

8. What is your character’s greatest strength and greatest weakness? Explain.

 

This activity adapted from one at http://mrfidlerswebsite.net.

 

Final Project: The Mockingbird Monologues (500 points)

Atticus tells Scout that if she can “learn a simple trick,” she will “get along a lot better with all kinds of folks” (33). Atticus says, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…until you climb into his skin and walk around in it” (33). That’s exactly what you are going to do for your final project.

As your final project, you will write and perform a monologue based on a character from Harper Lee’sTo Kill a Mockingbird.

You will embody a character, taking on his/her traits, beliefs, attitudes, fears, and feelings as your own.

Choose one of the following options:

a) Write a monologue from a moment that doesn’t actually occur in the book (before the book starts, one that isn’t fully described in the book, or an epilogue that takes place after the book ends).

OR

b) The novel is told from Scout’s perspective. Choose one other character in the novel and write a monologue of his/her inner thoughts during a key moment in the plot.

 

Written Script Requirements:

The monologue must be 3-5 minutes in length (when it is performed).

Write in proper script format (use A Midsummer Night’s Dream for formatting). Use this link to the template on GoogleDocs.

Write a brief scenario (1-2 paragraphs) describing the situation or what has occurred before the start of your monologue. This comes before your description of your setting in your script. This is written only; you will not perform this introduction.

Include stage directions (describe movement, name the emotion the character is experiencing as they speak or describe the way that the character is speaking).

Your monologue must reflect your character’s life story, as told in the novel and as supplemented by you, including but not limited to the following: manner of speaking, vocabulary, voice, attitude, appearance, clothing, age, career or other community role, socioeconomic background, etc. While you may add new information to create a rounder character, you may not contradict anything in the novel.

Your monologue must be historically accurate and should reflect the historical, cultural, and social context of the time period.

Your monologue will be almost like a missing scene from the novel; we’ll see but the only person speaking will be your character. The goal is to show the audience what your character was really thinking inside when certain events from the novel happened.

You get to choose what your character says and the underlying circumstances for the monologue (when, where, and why your character says what s/he does). You even get to make up a backstory that sheds new light on your character—just so long as the new facts you add do not contradict the facts presented in the novel.

A template for writing your monologue can be found on Google Drive. Click here.

 

Performance Requirements:

The monologue must be memorized if performed live or must appear to be memorized if recorded.

The monologue must be well-rehearsed and polished.

The performance must include costumes and props appropriate to the characters and the monologue.

The performance must be in character. Use voice and movement that reflects the character.

The video and audio quality of the recording must be high; there can be no background noise, shaky cameras, and so on.

Any editing of the video must be done as seamlessly as possible. The video should look professional, not like something you hastily created at the last minute.

If you are not proficient in recording or editing movies, please ask for help from someone who is.

 

Characteristics of Powerful Monologues:

  • Have and make a clear point.
  • Reveal the character’s inner thoughts, feelings, tensions, anxieties, and desires.
  • Portray powerful and personal emotions.
  • May show change in the character – whether a change in heart or attitude.
  • Use a variety of tones.
    • A monologue that starts in one place and ends up somewhere entirely different will make the tension more dramatic, the characters more compelling, and your script much better.
    • A good monologue should be alternatively funny, harrowing, and touching, pointing on no one emotion or no one state by itself.
  • Have a clear beginning, middle, and end.
    • Even if the character is not changed significantly, perhaps their decision to speak up is a change in and of itself. A taciturn character driven to a long monologue is revealing, when deployed properly. Why have they spoken up now? How does this change the way we feel about them?
    • Consider allowing the character to change as they speak over the course of their monologue. If a character starts in a rage, it might be more interesting for their to end in hysterics, or laughter. If they start out laughing, maybe they end up contemplative. Use the monologue as a vessel for change.
    • If it’s a story, it needs to have an arc. If it’s a rant, it needs to change into something else. If it’s a plea, it needs to up the ante over the course of its pleading.
    • The beginning of a good monologue will hook the audience and the other characters. The beginning should signal that something important is happening.
    • In the middle, the monologue should climax. Build it to its maximum height and then bring it back down to lower the tension and allow the conversation between the characters to continue or end entirely. This is where the specific details, the drama, and the tangents in the monologue will occur.
    • The ending should bring the speech or the story back around to the play at hand. The tension of the monologue is relieved and the scene ends on that note of finality.

 

Reflection:

After writing and performing your monologue, you will write a two- to three-page reflection on what you have learned not only in studying To Kill a Mockingbird and completing this Mockingbird Monologues project, but all what you have learned throughout the entire year in 8th grade English. Full detailed questions to be answered in your reflection will be provided.

 

Rubric:

Mockingbird Monologue Rubric PDF

 

DUE DATES:

1ST ROUGH DRAFT OF MONOLOGUE DUE: FRIDAY, MAY 30TH.

2ND ROUGH DRAFT OF MONOLOGUE (REVISED FROM 1ST ROUGH DRAFT) DUE: MONDAY, JUNE 2ND.

IN-CLASS PERFORMANCES FOR THOSE WHO CHOOSE TO PERFORM: FRIDAY, JUNE 6TH.

FINAL DRAFT OF ENTIRE PROJECT, INCLUDING SCRIPT, VIDEO, AND REFLECTION DUE: MONDAY, JUNE 9TH.

IF YOU COMPLETE THE PROJECT EARLY AND WOULD LIKE TO PERFORM OR SHOW YOUR VIDEO TO THE CLASS BEFORE FRIDAY, JUNE 6TH, YOU ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE EXTRA CREDIT. EXTRA CREDIT WILL BE AWARDED BASED UPON THE QUALITY OF THE PROJECT. FINISHING EARLY DOES NOT GUARANTEE EXTRA CREDIT.

 

HELP:

The Horton Foote script of the film version of TKAM

Template for monologue script formatting

Pre-Writing Help: Mockingbird Monologue Pre-Writing Worksheets — These are Word docs that you can upload into GoogleDocs.

 

Dr. Walczak adapted ideas found in these sources:

wikihow.com/Make-a-Monologue

msgallin9300.wordpress.com

mathman.dreamhosters.com

mrfidlerswebsite.net

 

TRTJ Paragraph(s) FINAL DRAFT DUE FRIDAY 5/23.

IN YOUR FINAL DRAFT, COLOR CODE THE PARTS OF YOUR PAPER AS FOLLOWS:

GREEN = THESIS

RED = INTRODUCTION TO QUOTES

BLUE = EXPLANATION OF QUOTES

BOLD BLACK = QUOTATION MARKS, PARENTHESES, PAGE NUMBER, PERIOD AT THE VERY END FOR ALL QUOTES.

ITALICIZE THE BOOK TITLE

Make sure you begin your paragraph with context about the book.

Make sure there are no grammar or mechanics errors.

 

 


 

FOR ROUGH DRAFTS:

1. Underline your thesis statement.

2. Bold where you introduce each piece of evidence. DO NOT introduce quotes by saying what page they’re on. Introduce quotes by providing context for them.

3. Italicize where you explain how each piece of evidence supports your thesis statement. Show where you connect the evidence to your thesis.

4. Underline your conclusions. Show where you tie your conclusions back to your thesis.

5. Check for grammar and mechanical errors. NOTE: I will stop reading at the first grammar/mechanics error I see.

 

AFTER YOU IDENTIFY THESE THINGS ON YOUR OWN DRAFT, TRADE WITH A PARTNER.

LOOK AT EVERYTHING THEY’VE IDENTIFIED ON THEIR DRAFT. SUGGEST REVISIONS AS NEEDED.

Consider…

1. Does your partner have a thesis statement?

2. Do they introduce each piece of evidence? If they introduce quotes by saying what page they’re on, suggest a change that provides context for the quote.

3. Do they explain how each piece of evidence supports their thesis statement. If not, help them connect the evidence to their thesis.

4. Do they draw conclusions? If not, help them tie their conclusions back to their thesis.

5. Check for grammar and mechanical errors. NOTE: I will stop reading at the first grammar/mechanics error I see.

 

Tom Robinson and Tim Johnson (100 pts)

Tom Robinson and Tim Johnson Analysis

Name your GoogleDoc: 8-# TRTJ Analysis your first name and last initial

(example: 8-1 TRTJ Analysis Lily R. and Natalie L.)

Rough Draft Due: Wednesday 5/21.

Final Draft Due: Friday 5/23.

On pages 239-41, Scout hears the verdict in Tom Robison’s trial.

Scout likens the atmosphere in the courtroom to the time “when the mockingbirds were still and the carpenters had stopped hammering on Miss Maudie’s new house, and every wood door in the neighborhood was shut as tight as the doors of the Radley Place. A deserted, waiting, empty street, and the courtroom packed with people” (240). She expects to hear Mr. Tate say, “‘Take him, Mr. Finch’” (240).

And when the jury files in, she immediately realizes that none of the jurors look at Tom Robinson, meaning she knows they have convicted him. She thinks, “…and it was like watching Atticus walk into the street, raise a rifle to his shoulder and pull the trigger, but watching all the time knowing that the gun was empty” (240).

Why in this scene when Tom Robinson is found guilty does Scout harken back to the scene in which Atticus shoots the rabid dog in the street? What connects these two scenes? Think symbolically and metaphorically, not literally.

To answer this question, you will write one to two paragraphs:

  • Start with an intriguing, thought-provoking, clear, and concise THESIS STATEMENT that establishes the point you want to make about how these two scenes connect. In your thesis statement, very explicitly state how these two scenes connect.
  • Then, prove your thesis is correct. Give at least THREE reasons why your thesis statement is right. Support each of your reasons with evidence from the novel. Each of your three reasons should include:
    • Introduction to the passage you will cite as evidence.
    • The passage itself.
    • Explanation of how this passage supports or proves your thesis statement.
  • Draw a conclusion and demonstrate how these three reasons prove your point about how these two scenes connect.
  • Throughout, provide context for your audience. Pretend that your audience has not read the novel in a long time so you have to set up the scene for them, very briefly explaining what is happening in that scene. Always provide the background information your audience needs in order to understand what you’re stating in your paragraph.
  • Keep the need for focus and brevity in mind.
  • A paragraph should be about nine to twelve sentences long.

There are not necessarily three right or wrong reasons; however, your three reasons should demonstrate that you are critically thinking about the novel, that you are thinking symbolically and metaphorically, and that you can support your ideas with specific textual evidence.

Important Pages:

The “One-Shot Finch” scene in which Atticus shoots the rabid dog and Miss Maudie remarks on Atticus’s “unfair advantage” is on pages 108-113.

Atticus’s explanation of “courage” (“…instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand…”) is on page 128.

A townsperson’s comment that Atticus “aims” to defend Tom Robinson is on page 186.

Atticus’s closing remarks are on pages 230-234.

Preparation for and Reflection on English for Student-Parent-Teacher Conferences.

Paragraph on Frost’s “Stopping by Woods…” and Bly’s “Driving to Town…”

Now that you have completed your paragraph (alone or with your writing partner), you will exchange work with a peer review partner and help each other identify four important parts of your responses.

  • Introduction of the poems (poem titles, poets’ names) = italics.
  • Specific thesis (exactly what they will prove in their paragraph) = bold.
  • At least four examples (evidence, meaning quotes from the poems) = underline each.
  • Conclusion (wraps up the paragraph) = italics.

If you cannot find these things, they may be missing. Let the writer know.

Then, read your peer review partner’s work for its fluency, sentence variety, word choice, grammar, mechanics, and so on. Help one another put together the best paragraph you possibly can.

When you have read one another’s work, discuss your paragraphs together. Ensure your paragraph is complete and successfully meets the expectations and requirements of the writing assignment.

 

Reflection on English Class

Let’s take a few minutes to reflect on where we are and where we’re going in English. On loose-leaf, please address the following questions in a paragraph format in complete sentences.

Please write neatly and legibly.

Again, please write in paragraph format in complete sentences.

What are the skills, habits, and knowledge you need to be successful in critically reading, thinking, and writing — not just in English class but in assignments in all of your classes?

What are the three skills or habits you feel most confident and most comfortable in?

What skills, habits, or knowledge are you still struggling with?

How would you describe and evaluate your attitude, behavior, participation, and engagement in class activities and discussions?

Set at least two goals for yourself for the remainder of the school year. What do you hope to accomplish in the last few months of English?

For Monday 3/3/14.

Hi, 8th graders. I won’t be at school on Monday. Please work with Mr. Gonring on the following…

Frost-Bly Stopping-Driving Paragraph

One to two paragraphs comparing and contrasting Frost and Bly poems. The instructions are on the handout.

You may choose to work alone or with one partner. There cannot be a group of three.

Remember, this assignment is giving me a snapshot of your skills so that I can evaluate and discuss your skills at Student-Parent-Teacher Conferences. Thus, you are very highly encouraged to put forth your very best effort, quality, and focus.

This is NOT due at the end of the period, and it is NOT homework. It’s an in-class writing assignment. We will return to it tomorrow. You should NOT work on it as homework.

English 8-5 — I know we’re a bit behind on sonnets, but we will get caught up next week. For today (Monday 3/3), work on this assignment for conferences.

 

Homework:

For all classes except 8-5 (6th period):

Typed final draft of sonnet, poster, and link to glog/video/other added to “Sonnet Glogs” post on class website due Tuesday 3/4. Double-check to make sure your link works.

For English 8-5 (6th period): Keep working on sonnets.

Sonnet Peer Review

Sonnet Peer Review

  1. Write “Peer Reviewed by…” and sign your name at the top of the page.
  2. Check stanzas.
  3. Check rhyme scheme. Write the rhyme scheme at the end of each line.
  4. Check number of syllables per line. Write number of syllables at the end of each line.
  1. Look for all the words with more than one syllable in them. Before you look at iambic pentameter, mark the stressed and unstressed words in all the multi-syllabic words. This will ensure you know where the stress/unstress should fall for these words.
  1. Check iambic pentameter. Mark the iambic pentameter for each line.
    1. With multisyllabic words, do the stress/unstress line up with the iambic pentameter pattern? (Meaning, does the stressed syllable of the word fall where the stress should be in the pattern?)
    1. Are the important words stressed and the less important words like “the” unstressed?
    1. If there are places where the iambic pentameter break down, underline them and write “IP” next to it for “iambic pentameter.”
  1. Look at word choice. Make a note of interesting words and strong verbs. Then, underline words that should be reconsidered and write “WC” next to them for “word choice.”

Remember, iambic pentameter is like your heartbeat:

da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM…

If you are using a multisyllabic word (word with more than one syllable), the stress has to fall on the syllable that is normally stressed when you say the word out loud. You may not change how the word is said in order to fit your poem.

The English Sonnet

  • 14 lines in Iambic Pentameter.
  • Three quatrains and a couplet.
  • First three stanzas:  Quatrains (four lines each).
    • Rhyme scheme:  abab cdcd efef.
    • Quatrains tell the story.
  • Last stanza:  Couplet (two lines).
    • Rhyme scheme:  gg.
    • Couplet can make the final statement OR it can turn a corner and contradict the quatrains. You do not have to have a volta in your sonnet.

DUE TUESDAY 3/2:

TYPED, PRINTED FINAL DRAFT OF SONNET

PRINTED POSTER

LINK TO GLOG/OTHER ON THE “SONNET GLOGS” POST

I WILL NOT PRINT FOR YOU. SORRY…

Sonnet Glogs!

Leave a link to your Glog as a comment to this post. Include your first name, last initial, and section with your link.

 

DUE TUESDAY 3/2:

TYPED, PRINTED FINAL DRAFT OF SONNET

PRINTED POSTER

LINK TO GLOG/OTHER ON THE “SONNET GLOGS” POST — THAT’S THIS POST.

I WILL NOT PRINT FOR YOU. SORRY…

Sonnet Project (200 points)

Yes, you are going to write a sonnet. I know you can do it! Your subject? LOVE.  But “love” doesn’t have to mean romantic love. It could be your passion for the game of football or for riding competitions, your dedication to the violin or the stage, your love for your family or your dog, your undying devotion to chocolate chip cookies, your favorite stuffed animal, or your favorite video game. Your topic is LOVE in the abstract – you may make it concrete in any way you want.

Please follow the traditional patterns for English sonnets listed below.

Remember, iambic pentameter is like your heartbeat:

da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM…

But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?…

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?

If you are using a multisyllabic word (word with more than one syllable), the stress has to fall on the syllable that is normally stressed when you say the word out loud. You may not change how the word is said in order to fit your poem.

The English Sonnet

  • 14 lines in Iambic Pentameter.
  • Three quatrains and a couplet.
  • First three stanzas:  Quatrains (four lines each).
    • Rhyme scheme:  abab cdcd efef.
    • Quatrains tell the story.
  • Last stanza:  Couplet (two lines).
    • Rhyme scheme:  gg.
    • Couplet can make the final statement OR it can turn a corner and contradict the quatrains. You do not have to have a volta in your sonnet.

Sonnet Composition Worksheet

As you did with your haiku project, create a poster for your sonnet. Your poster should be on regular 8.5×11 paper. It should include a large image that relates to your sonnet in some way. Your poem should be in at least 16 pt. font. Please feel free to be creative with your poster!

Additionally, create a glogster for your sonnet. Include images and other multimedia that relate to and highlight your sonnet. Your glogster should be creative and original, engaging, and visually appealing. It should also be clean, neat, and easy to navigate and follow. If you would like to create other multimedia to embed in your glogster, such as an xtranormal or a voiki, please feel free; however, no matter what you create, please keep the tone in line with your poem. Create a link to your glogster on the blog; please be sure your link works! (If you would like to create something other than a glog, check with me.)

Note: If it works, a printed copy of your glogster can serve as your poster. By “if it works,” I mean if it is easy to read, if the font is large enough, and so on…

DUE TUESDAY 3/2:

TYPED, PRINTED FINAL DRAFT OF SONNET

PRINTED POSTER

LINK TO GLOG/OTHER ON THE “SONNET GLOGS” POST

I WILL NOT PRINT FOR YOU. SORRY…

Haiku Videos

Please leave a link to your haiku video as a comment to this post.

Please be sure to include your first name and last initial and your section (English 8-1, etc.) with your link.

Please double-check to make sure your link works.

Enjoy your classmates’ haiku videos — a lot of hard work went into these poems! :)

Haiku Peer Review (or, “Boring! Ack! I hate it!”)

Haiku Project Peer Review

Open the Word doc above for instructions for the haiku peer review.

When you have completed peer review, begin revisions. Refer back to the original assignment as you prepare your final products.

FINAL DRAFT OF ENTIRE PROJECT, INCLUDING:

1. TYPED, PRINTED COPY OF ALL FOUR POEMS

2. A PRINTED POSTER OF ONE OF YOUR POEMS

3. A VIDEO OF ALL FOUR OF YOUR POEMS (POST LINK ON BLOG)

DUE MONDAY 2/24.

Notes about Haiku

Haikus do the following:

    • Capture the moment; capture the intensity of a specific moment, not a general time.
    • Focus on the concrete, real world, not the abstract realm of inner thoughts and feelings.
    • Traditionally involve nature and suggest a season.  World view is one in which nature and the observer are one, not separate.

Pattern for Haiku:

3 lines, 17 syllables

    • 1st line – 5 syllables
    • 2nd line – 7 syllables
    • 3rd line – 5 syllables

 

Past Student Haikus:

“The Lesson”

A fluttering glide,

The duck and drake race ahead,

The ducklings pursue.

 

“The Stalker”

Perched in the willow,

The owl surveys his target,

A night shadow swoops.

Analysis of l(a) by e.e. cummings.

Now that you know what the poem says literally, consider what it means to you more metaphorically. What do you think the poem means beyond the surface or literal level — what does it mean to you on a deeper more symbolic level?

Compose at least one paragraph (about 7-12 sentences). Include a topic sentence, support for your analysis with evidence from the poem itself, and a closing sentence.

Remember the concept of the persona — the narrator or speaker in the poem. You can interpret the poem in countless ways, but the interpretation is of the persona, not the poet. (Meaning, this poem may have nothing at all to do with e.e. cummings himself.)

1(a

le

af

fa

ll

s)

one

l

iness

“The Pickets” in Heroic Couplets

Retell “The Pickets” in Heroic Couplets.

Heroic Couplets = 2 lines that rhyme; 10 syllables per line. (Heroic Couplets are written in iambic pentameter, but we’ll worry about that later…for now, just worry about number of syllables per line and rhyme.)

Rewrite “The Pickets” in 10 Heroic Couplets — 20 lines, 10 syllables each, 10 rhyme pairs.

All group mates must take their own notes so that you may finish the assignment on your own if needed. Consider working in GoogleDocs and sharing the document will all your group mates.

ThePickets

Poe or Doyle Flash Fiction – Final Project due Wed 12/4.

FINAL DRAFT OF STORY AND DIGITAL STORYTELLING DUE WED 12/4.

JUST A REMINDER, THIS IS A 200 POINT ASSIGNMENT.

Edgar Allan Poe or Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Flash Fiction (200 points)

For this creative writing assignment, you are asked to channel your inner Edgar Allan Poe or Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.  Following Poe’s or Doyle’s lead, you will write a “flash fiction” piece (a very short story) or poetry of your own in the horror or mystery genre.  You have creative freedom for this assignment, but here are some ideas, as well as the requirements you will need to follow.

Ideas:

  • Write a horror, suspense, or mystery story that is completely your own.
  • Write a modern-day version of one of the stories we’ve read.
  • Turn one of the short stories we’ve read into a poem or turn “The Raven” into a short story.
  • Write a backstory for one of the characters we’ve read about.

Requirements:

  1. Use vocabulary words!  You may use words from either ABC or Poe, but use at least THREE vocabulary words in your story or poetry.
  2. Whether you write poetry or a short story, you may write no fewer than 500 words and absolutely no more than 1000 words. You will include a word count with your final draft!
  3. Create a digital version of your story using a digital storytelling site or app such as Book Creator, TouchApp Creator, TouchCast, Explain Everything, Google Sites, VoiceThread, StoryKit, Scribble Press, Puppet Pals, StoryJumper, or Toontastic. We will link our stories on the class blog.
  4. Please, no gratuitous violence and absolutely no violence against classmates or other members of the USM community.

Focus on VOICE and WORD CHOICE in your writing.

IDEAS FOR DIGITAL STORYTELLING:

http://www.edudemic.com/8-powerful-apps-to-help-you-create-books-on-the-ipad/

http://fluency21.com/blog/2013/03/21/a-list-of-the-best-free-digital-storytelling-tools-for-teachers/

http://www.teachthought.com/technology/36-digital-storytelling-sites-and-apps-from-edshelf/

http://www.teachthought.com/apps-2/15-literacy-apps-to-create-books-on-the-ipad/

 

RUBRIC: Flash Fiction Rubric PDF

Investigating “The Raven”

DUE MONDAY 11/18.

PLEASE POST A LINK TO YOUR VISUAL AS A REPLY TO THIS POST.

FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS PROVIDED. THANK YOU!

Investigating “The Raven” (50 pts)

With your group, explore the topic you are given. Begin by taking careful notes in GoogleDocs (8-section# Investigating The Raven Group# Names). Then, create a thinglink, tackk, glogster, googlesiteweebly, creaza, ticklypictures, or other visual to share your group’s information with the entire class.

All Groups: Rhyme, Rhythm, and Repetition

With your group, explore the rhyme scheme, rhythm, and repetition, including alliteration, in “The Raven.”  What patterns do you discover?

Assigned Groups: Allusions and Vocabulary

With your group, explore the rich allusions and vocabulary in “The Raven.”  Do your best to identify and explain the reference or the word in the context of the poem.  Show how the reference or the allusion works in the poem. To help you identify and explain the reference or the word, consider including images, links, or anything else that would prove helpful.

For the words, include the part of speech and the definition.

Use “The Raven” links on the Poe page.

Allusions — Group One:

Raven

Pallas (41)

thy crest be shorn and shaven…craven (45)

Night’s Plutonian shore (47)

Disaster (63)

Hope (59, 65)

censer (79)

Allusions–Group Two:

seraphim (80)

nepenthe (82)

Prophet (85, 91)

Tempter (86)

tempest (86)

balm in Gilead (89)

Aidenn (93)

Vocabulary–Group Three:

dreary (1)

quaint (2)

lore (2)

bleak (7)

morrow (9, 59)

surcease (10)

entreating (16)

implore (20)

scarce (23)

lattice (33)

flirt (37)

stately (38)

yore (38)

obeisance (39)

Vocabulary–Group Four:

mien (40)

beguiling (43,67)

grave (44)

decorum (44)

craven (45)

marvelled (49)

ungainly (49)

placid (55)

aptly (61)

stock (62)

dirges (65)

melancholy (65)

fancy (43, 67, 70)

wheeled (68)

Vocabulary–Group Five:

ominous (70)

divining (75)

gloated (76)

tufted (80)

wretch (81)

respite (82)

quaff (83)

desolate (87)

undaunted (87)

laden (93)

sainted (94)

fiend (97)

plume (99)

pallid (104)

Topic Sentences and Attributive Tags (for citing sources)

Remember, every paragraph includes a clear, concise, interesting, intriguing TOPIC SENTENCE. Check out these examples:

  • Edgar Allan Poe’s early life was far from what one would imagine a world-class author would have. — Walter
  • Edgar Allan Poe had a scarring, traumatic childhood; it was certainly far from perfect. – Maya
  • Edgar Allan Poe had a remarkably tough childhood, but through the hardships, he led a mysterious, but incredible, life. – Logan
  • Edgar Allan Poe had a dismal childhood, a childhood that influenced him to become one of the greatest horror authors in American literature. – Anshul
  • An American author, poet, and literary critic, Edgar Allan Poe experienced a mysterious life. – Arianna
  • Edgar Allan Poe had a dismal childhood, becoming orphaned from extreme poverty. – Cole and DJ
  • A great American horror story author, Edgar Allan Poe came from a rough background that was continuously changing. – Charlotte and Liz
  • Although Edgar Allan Poe had a difficult childhood, he pursued his dreams and became an author.  – Nick and Nate
  • The mysterious writer Edgar Allan Poe went through a very traumatic and heartbreaking childhood. – Tommy and Brandon
  • Edgar Allan Poe, one of the greatest American horror writers, had a very tragic, traumatic childhood. – Danny
  • Throughout the world, Edgar Allan Poe is known for his frightening and twisted stories, which play on human fears, weaknesses, and emotions. However, every story has a beginning, and Poe’s story begins with a horrid, tragic childhood. – Emma S and Jo
  • The childhood of Edgar Allan Poe, famous nineteenth century writer, was painful and tragic and had an everlasting impact on his writing and his life. – Matthew and Will Ko
  • A great American author, Edgar Allan Poe had a sorrowful and harrowing childhood. – Leo and Will V
  • Edgar Allan Poe is famous today for his twisted tales of astounding depth and phenomenal, but often gruesome, detail. However, everyone has a backstory, and Poe’s life was difficult from the very beginning. – Kai S
  • Mystery, horror, sadness. Edgar Allan Poe, an American horror author, experienced a very tragic childhood. – Jaci
  • Edgar Allan Poe did not have an idea childhood, as he lose many loved ones and faced poverty. – Eva
  • Edgar Allan Poe was a man of much character and grief, as tragedy follow dim in every step of his life. – Hans and Amer

Also be sure to cite your sources within your paragraphs using ATTRIBUTIVE TAGS. Check out these examples:

NOTE: If you are citing a website, cite the NAME of the website, not the URL.

  • According to the PoeStories.com website, Poe’s parents’ separation and death must have caused him a lot of sadness and strife early on. – Maya
  • According to the Edgar Allan Poe Museum’s website, John Allan was a wealthy man and sent young Edgar to many places and good schools; although Edgar always loved poetry, his adoptive father never supported it. – Nyle
  • John Allan was a successful merchant, so Poe grew up in good surroundings, according to the PoeStories.com website. Still, Poe’s relationship with his adoptive father had its rough patches. – Liz and Charlotte
  • According to Edgar Allan Poe A to Z by Dawn B. Sova, the influence his adoptive parents was a healthier one than his birth parents had. – Sophie and Kaitlyn
  • According to Karen E. Lange, author of Nevermore, Edgar Allan Poe’s adoptive parents influenced him with a stern hand but also protected him, including defending him against the truth and reality of his parents’ death. – Emma S and Jo
  • According to the PoeStories.com website, Poe grew up in friendly surroundings, and John Allan provided him with quality schooling at an early age; this early education may have greatly influenced Poe’s writing. – Will K and Matthew M
  • The Edgar Allan Poe Museum’s website states that John Allan was a wealthy tobacco merchant, and that is the reason Edgar was able to attend a very good quality school to learn to study poetry.
  • According to Edgar Allan Poe by Thomas Streissguth, Poe’s father David Poe was very distant and left his family the same year his wife, Poe’s mother, passed away.

Find more information about citing sources here.

The Life and Times of Edgar Allan Poe – Complete final draft due Wed 10/30.

Who was — who is — Edgar Allan Poe? That is the question you’ll answer in the Life and TImes of Poe Project.

Project Assignment:

Life and Times of Poe Project

Project Rubric:

Life and Times of Poe Rubric

Due Date for complete final draft of the entire project: Wednesday 10/30/13. 
Before submitting anything, please make sure you double- and triple-check that your project meets (and hopefully exceeds!) all requirements and expectations by consulting both the project assignment sheet and the rubric.

“The Tell-Tale Heart” Criminal Minds – New due date: Thurs 10/24.

DUE THURS 10/24 VIA GOOGLEDOCS.

Utilize the Interrogation Report (Tell-Tale Heart Interrogation Report) to submit your work to the precinct captain via GoogleDocs. Upload your final Word doc to GoogleDocs and share it with me: lbarthwalczak@ga.usmk12.org.

Label your GoogleDoc: 8-# Criminal Minds Detectives Names.

Example: 8-1 Criminal Minds Detectives Lily R and Liam C

You and your partner are both seasoned, street-smart members of the Behavioral Analysis Unit, “an elite team of FBI profilers who analyze the country’s most twisted criminal minds, anticipating their next moves before they strike again.” You’ve been called to a grisly crime scene to interrogate a murder suspect. Walking in, all you know is that the suspect is accused of murdering an elderly man, and when the cops found him, he was yelling about some kind of heartbeat…

With your partner, submit an Interrogation Report.  Answer the following questions in the “Narrative of Interrogation” section. Write in first-person point of view in the voice of an FBI profiler.

1. One of your first priorities is to establish whether or not you can believe what the suspect tells you. Explain what behaviors, language, or other signals you look for to determine whether or not the suspect is telling the unmitigated truth. How will you be able to tell whether or not you can trust the suspect’s version of events?

2. Explain your first impressions of the suspect. Re-read the first paragraph of “The Tell-Tale Heart” (page 74). What does it tell us about the narrator? What later event(s) does it foreshadow?

3. The suspect continually insists that he’s not “mad.” Look through the story and find THREE separate times when the narrator insists he is not mad. Copy the sentences with the page numbers on your interrogation report.  How does he seem to define “madness,” or in other words, what does the suspect identify as the characteristics of madness? Does his definition of “madness” match your own understanding of madness as a criminal profiler? Why or why not?

4. The suspect describes the police officers who discovered his crime. The narrator says the officers “chatted pleasantly, and smiled” (page 78). Does this description seem plausible to you — do you think the officers would agree with this description? What do you think the police officers in the story were thinking when they were with the narrator?

5. What is your final analysis of the crime scene and the suspect? What insight do you have into his mind? In other words, what do you think were his true motives, why do you think he committed the crime, and do you think he would strike again?

Tell-Tale Heart Interrogation Report

Citing Your Sources.

For the Life and Times of Poe Project:

Within your entries, if you use a source’s exact words or phrases or if you use a source’s original ideas that you would not find anywhere else, you must use quotation marks if appropriate and cite the source in the paragraph. If you are citing general information, like his birthday or the day of his death or information that can be found in multiple sources, you do not have to cite the source in the paragraph, but rather you can just include the source on the bibliography.

Cite your sources using attributive tags!

  • Whenever you use information you’ve found in a source, you need to explain where the information is from.  This is called “citing.”
  • The first time you use a source in your essay, introduce the source with a little more detail.   Give the name of the source, the name of the author, and any additional important information.
  • Every time you quote or paraphrase information from a source, cite the information with at least the author’s name, or if no author, the title.  You need to do so whether you are directly quoting or paraphrasing your source.
  • If you are quoting a source word for word or if you are using a word or phrase that you found in your source, you must use quotation marks.
  • Use MLA style to cite your sources!  If you are citing an online source, you may not have a page number to include.

Good attributive tags for citing information:

According to  __________, author of the book __________, . . . (pg#).

In the article __________, author __________ explains that . . . (pg#).

The website __________ states that . . .

On the website __________, author __________ writes that . . .

__________, author of the webpage __________, states that . . .

The webpage __________ suggests that . . .

Change up the way you introduce your sources and cite your information!

See examples of effective topic sentences and attributive tags here.

Reflections on our Skype with Gene Yang

On Monday 9/30, we had the exciting opportunity to Skype with Gene Yang. As a “comment” to this blog post, please reflect on our questions and Mr. Yang’s answers and compose a well-written paragraph on what you learned or realized in our talk. Consider, what did you find interesting? What did you find surprising? Were your ideas about ABC challenged or confirmed? What did you take away from the Skype with Gene Yang?

Responses should be at least one well-written paragraph, about 8-12 sentences long, with a clear topic sentence, sentence fluency and variety, descriptive word choices, and specific examples and details. Please proofread for grammar and conventions, as well. Your response may be longer than one paragraph.

I challenge you to use the sentence composing tools we’ve learned this year — opening adjective and adverbs, delayed adjectives and adverbs, and absolute phrases. I also challenge you to use vocabulary words.

Compose, peer review, and revise your paragraph in GoogleDocs, Word, or Pages. When your paragraph is complete and you are confident in your final draft, then copy and paste it onto the blog.

Include your name (first name, last initial) and section at the top of your response.

This response is a graded formal writing assignment, worth 25 points. Moreover, a link to all of our responses will be forwarded to Gene Yang and First Second Books.

The video of our Skype, which is password protected, can be found on vimeo: http://vimeo.com/usmenglish8/geneyangskype2013. See me for the password.

Here are the questions we asked Gene Yang:

2013 Skype with Gene Yang Questions

The Adventures of the Monkey King (25 points – due Monday 9/30)

Create your own comic about the Monkey King.  You may depict a scene from Journey to the West, explore what happens before or after the events of American Born Chinese, or write an original story.  Just stay true to the essence of the Monkey King.  Be creative and take risks, even if you don’t think of yourself as “artistic.”  Your work is evaluated for artistic effort and integrity!

 Requirements:

  • Must be at least six panels long. The size and arrangement of your panels is up to you.
  • Must be in color.  If you create your comic on the computer, either print in color or print and then color in by hand.
  • Must use at least TWO ABC vocabulary words. Show you know what the words mean and how to use them appropriately.
  • Spelling, grammar, and mechanics count! Write rough drafts and proofread as you would for any writing assignment before creating your final draft.
  • You will turn in a hard copy, so if you create on the computer, please print!

Due Date: Monday, September 30th.

Absolute Phrases

Absolute Phrases (pages 38-39 of the green grammar book) —

Give additional information or detail…About what is happening at that same time…Giving us a better picture of what is going on.

Absolutes are almost complete sentences; you can make an absolute a complete sentence by adding was or were.

Absolutes often start with possessive pronouns (my, his, her, its, our, their). Possessive pronouns can be stated (visible) or implied.

Practice Absolute Phrases —

Green grammar book homework for Monday 9/23:

Page 40 Practice 3

Page 41 Practice 4 — Write your own imitation of ALL THREE SENTENCES. Don’t just choose one; do ALL THREE.

Page 41-42 Practice 5

Please be sure to follow all of the instructions. Again, for Practice 4, write your own imitation for ALL THREE.

Type or handwrite on paper. Please do not write in the book.

Need help with Absolutes? Look at the links on the writing page of the blog.

Practice with Delayed Adjectives

Remember, adverbs describe an action — how, where, or when an action happens. See page 30 in your green grammar book.

Please write five sentences using delayed adverbs. Delayed adverbs may come in the middle or at the end of the sentence, after the action they describe. Set them off with commas. You may choose any adverbs you like. Be creative! :)

If you’re desperate for adverbs, you can check this list: http://www.momswhothink.com/reading/list-of-adverbs.html.

Practice Writing with Delayed Adjectives

What’s a delayed adjective? See page 18 of your green grammar book.

Go to the Random Adjective Generator.

Set “Quantity” to 5.

Keep “Duplicates” unchecked.

Hit “Refresh List” to generate your list of 5 adjectives.

Now, write five sentence, using each one of the five as a delayed adjective. If you don’t know what a word means, look it up! : )

Be prepared to share your sentences with the class on Monday 9/9.

Practice Writing with Opening Adjectives

What’s an opening adjective? See page 12 of your green grammar book (aka G4MS, ie the-would-be-zombie-apocalypse-starting-weird-lab-sounding-chemical-name book).

Go to the Random Adjective Generator.

Set “Quantity” to 5.

Keep “Duplicates” unchecked.

Hit “Refresh List” to generate your list of 5 adjectives.

Now, write five sentence, using each one of the five as an opening adjective. If you don’t know what a word means, look it up! : )

Be prepared to share your sentences with the class on Friday 9/6.